• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Ukraine - Superthread

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
12,817
Points
1,160
Meanwhile, the War in the Shadows rages on as well....


As Ukraine's military steps up its strikes on Kherson, hinting at a new offensive to recapture the region, there is another force working alongside. They are Ukraine's shadow army, a network of agents and informers who operate behind enemy lines.

Our journey to meet the resistance fighters takes us through a landscape of sunflower yellow and sky blue to Mykolaiv. The first major town on Ukrainian-controlled territory west of Kherson, it has become the partisans' headquarters on the southern front.

Driving through military checkpoints, we pass giant billboards showing a faceless, hooded figure alongside a warning: "Kherson: The partisans see everything." The image is designed to make the region's Russian occupiers nervous and boost the morale of those trapped under their rule.

"The resistance is not one group, it's total resistance," the man standing in front of me insists, his voice slightly muffled by a black mask he's pulled up from his neck so I can't see his face as we film him, in a room I can't describe so that neither can be found.

I'll call him Sasha.

Shortly before this war, Ukraine bolstered its Special Forces in part to build and manage a resistance movement. It even published a PDF booklet on how to be a good partisan, with instructions on such subversive acts as slashing the tyres of the occupier, adding sugar to petrol tanks or refusing to follow orders at work. "Be grumpy," is one suggestion.

But Sasha's team of informers have a more active role: tracking Russian troop movements inside Kherson.

"Say yesterday we saw a new target, then we send that to the military and in a day or two it's gone," he says, as we scroll through some of the many videos he's sent from the neighbouring region each day. One is from a man who drove past a military base and filmed Russian vehicles, another is from CCTV footage as Russian trucks pass by, daubed with their giant Z war-marks.

Sasha describes his "agents" as Ukrainians "who have not lost hope in victory and want our country to be freed".

"Of course they're afraid," he says. "But serving their country is more important."

Working alongside Sasha are a team who fly drones into Kherson to spot targets for the military. Civilians, not soldiers, all are volunteers and they fundraise on social media to pay for their expensive kit.

 

TacticalTea

Sr. Member
Reaction score
935
Points
910
Perhaps we should recognize Russia as a state sponsor of terrorism?

I'm livid right now.

This week only:
1. Russia wants to restore the Soviet Union. Officially.
2. They allow their soldiers to torture and dismember Ukrainian soldiers, record such heinous acts, and share them on the internet.
3. They bomb a prison under THEIR OWN CONTROL just to get rid of POWs, killing dozens.

They're a terrorist organization engaged in a genocidal war of aggression in Europe, and despite all that, our lousy government and equally incompetent medias - have I mentioned that I hate journalists? - carry on with their daily business, reporting platitudes about condoms and the Pope.

It appears that the greatest regret of my life will remain the fact that I didn't buy a one-way ticket to Poland in March of this year.
 

MilEME09

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
3,944
Points
1,090
I'm livid right now.

This week only:
1. Russia wants to restore the Soviet Union. Officially.
2. They allow their soldiers to torture and dismember Ukrainian soldiers, record such heinous acts, and share them on the internet.
3. They bomb a prison under THEIR OWN CONTROL just to get rid of POWs, killing dozens.

They're a terrorist organization engaged in a genocidal war of aggression in Europe, and despite all that, our lousy government and equally incompetent medias - have I mentioned that I hate journalists? - carry on with their daily business, reporting platitudes about condoms and the Pope.

It appears that the greatest regret of my life will remain the fact that I didn't buy a one-way ticket to Poland in March of this year.
Let's not forget those prisoner's were ordered to surrender because the UN and ICRC promised they would guarantee health and safety of the POWs. Both those organizations have failed in their duties ti these POWs.


Good luck convincing a single Ukrainian to surrender now, or trust the red cross
 

Kirkhill

Army.ca Myth
Subscriber
Donor
Reaction score
4,043
Points
1,060
Should have seen this coming

1 Had to stop the gas supply because of defective turbine
2 Gas supply stopped because turbine in for service in Canada
3 Gas supply stopped because Canadians won't return it
4 Gas supply stopped because Germans have it
5 Gas supply will stay stopped because Canadians didn't repair it properly

Nord Stream 1 gas row deepens as Gazprom airs new complaints on repaired turbine​

REUTERS
PUBLISHED 3 HOURS AGO
BDFIGTDYIBNWJGUKQ6ZZL7MF3A.JPG

Pipes at the landfall facilities of the Nord Stream 1 gas pipeline are pictured in Lubmin, Germany, on March 8.HANNIBAL HANSCHKE/REUTERS
12 COMMENTS
SHARE
BOOKMARK
LISTEN TO ARTICLE

Delivery of a Nord Stream 1 gas turbine to Germany from Canada after maintenance was not in line with the contract, Gazprom’s senior manager said on Friday, stepping up criticism of manufacturer Siemens Energy.
The comments signaled a deepening of a row in which Russia has cited turbine problems as its reason for cutting gas supply via Nord Stream 1 – its main gas link to Europe – to just 20% of capacity from Wednesday.
Vitaly Markelov, Gazprom’s deputy chief executive, also said Russia had complained repeatedly to Siemens Energy about problems with other turbines.
“We have repeatedly applied to the Russian representative office of Siemens about this, sent 10 letters. Siemens fixed no more than a quarter of the identified bugs,” he said in a TV interview.
He cited the serial numbers of three other engines that needed repair by Siemens because of faults in May and June that had put them in a state of forced downtime.
Siemens Energy declined to respond to Markelov’s comments. The company referred to a previous statement made on Wednesday in which it said it had no access to the turbines on site and had not received any damage reports from Gazprom and so had to assume the turbines were operating normally.
The European Union disputes Russia’s and Gazprom’s argument that turbine problems are to blame for the sharp drop in supply through the pipeline that links Russia to Germany under the Baltic Sea. The shortfall has raised the risk of shortages and gas rationing in Europe this winter.
Siemens Energy has previously countered Gazprom’s criticism over its service by saying it is up to the Russian company to file customs documents for the turbine’s return.
With both sides trading economic blows since Russia sent its troops into Ukraine on Feb. 24, the European Union has accused Russia of energy blackmail, something the Kremlin denies.
Markelov said the turbine that had been serviced in Canada had still not arrived back in Russia.

STORY CONTINUES BELOW ADVERTISEMENT


“It was sent to Germany, not to Russia, without Gazprom’s consent,” he said, adding that this created sanctions risks.
Gazprom also needs to send for repair other turbines from the Portovaya compressor station. “There is no clarity that the maintenance of the gas turbine engines will not fall under the sanctions,” Markelov said.

 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
12,817
Points
1,160
I'm livid right now.

This week only:
1. Russia wants to restore the Soviet Union. Officially.
2. They allow their soldiers to torture and dismember Ukrainian soldiers, record such heinous acts, and share them on the internet.
3. They bomb a prison under THEIR OWN CONTROL just to get rid of POWs, killing dozens.

They're a terrorist organization engaged in a genocidal war of aggression in Europe, and despite all that, our lousy government and equally incompetent medias - have I mentioned that I hate journalists? - carry on with their daily business, reporting platitudes about condoms and the Pope.

It appears that the greatest regret of my life will remain the fact that I didn't buy a one-way ticket to Poland in March of this year.

Good luck, and don't get caught!

Foreign fighters in Ukraine, many in motley groups, face perils if captured.​


Over the last few weeks, a number of the thousands of foreign volunteers who flocked to join the fight against Russia have gone missing or have been captured.

Last week, two Britons and a Moroccan who were taken prisoner while fighting for the Ukrainian armed forces were sentenced to death in Russia-occupied eastern Ukraine, after being accused of terrorism.

This week, two Americans fighting with a group of foreign soldiers went missing in action near Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second-largest city, which is about 25 miles from the Russian border. Their families fear they have been captured, having disappeared after the platoon came under fire.

The missing and captured fighters have focused attention on the thousands of largely unregulated volunteers in Ukraine, only some of whom have been accepted into the Ukrainian Army’s International Legion.

The platoon that the missing Americans belonged to was one of dozens of loosely organized volunteer outfits that have absorbed foreign veterans, including many Americans. The volunteers have proved to be both valuable assets and at times an unruly problem for Ukraine, and present a potentially difficult challenge for their home governments if they are caught or captured.


On Friday, President Biden said that he had been briefed on the two Americans reported to be missing in Ukraine, and that the administration does not know of their current location.

“I want to reiterate: Americans should not be going to Ukraine now,” he said.

The International Legion, formed after President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine issued a call in late February for foreigners to help fight, is considered the most selective of the foreign groups.

Damien Magrou, a French-Norwegian lawyer who is the spokesman for the Ukrainian military’s International Legion, said in an interview in April that he felt the war had “struck a chord” among many American veterans.

“There are also a lot of American vets who feel they can make a difference because the U.S. has been involved in a lot more conflicts in the last 20 years than European countries,” he said.

Mr. Magrou, a corporal in the legion’s structure, said volunteers now accepted by his organization had to pass background and psychological checks and were required to have combat experience, no records of dishonorable behavior and no membership in extremist groups. Other groups are not as selective, several military volunteers in Ukraine said.

The American veterans who are missing are Alex Drueke, 39, a former U.S. Army staff sergeant who served in Iraq, and Andy Tai Ngoc Huynh, 27, a former Marine, family members said. They disappeared when their platoon came under “heavy fire” in a village on June 9, leading all of its members to fall back except for the two of them, according to a statement sent by Mr. Drueke’s family. Reconnaissance by foot and drone did not turn up any sign of the two soldiers, the statement said.

The Geneva Conventions, which govern the law of war and which Russia has signed, specify that captured volunteer fighters can also be considered prisoners of war. The primary definition of a mercenary under international law is someone fighting primarily for financial gain who is paid substantially more than local armed forces.

Those who join the International Legion are paid the same amount as their Ukrainian military counterparts. They receive a basic salary, equaling about $630 a month, with bonuses that can reach several thousand dollars a month.

Some fighting with other groups are given one-time payments to defray their expenses, while others are unpaid.

Lawrence Hill-Cawthorne, an associate professor of law at the University of Bristol, said that even volunteer fighters not embedded in the Ukrainian military would be entitled to P.O.W. protection if they are openly carrying arms while fighting.

 

CBH99

Army.ca Veteran
Donor
Reaction score
1,342
Points
1,090
I'm livid right now.

This week only:
1. Russia wants to restore the Soviet Union. Officially.
2. They allow their soldiers to torture and dismember Ukrainian soldiers, record such heinous acts, and share them on the internet.
3. They bomb a prison under THEIR OWN CONTROL just to get rid of POWs, killing dozens.

They're a terrorist organization engaged in a genocidal war of aggression in Europe, and despite all that, our lousy government and equally incompetent medias - have I mentioned that I hate journalists? - carry on with their daily business, reporting platitudes about condoms and the Pope.

It appears that the greatest regret of my life will remain the fact that I didn't buy a one-way ticket to Poland in March of this year.
Amen brother. I came close, but by the time I had made peace with the decision, it had been going on for a few months & I figured it would be over soon. Like Crimea 2.0.

With the extremely long list of list of absolute s*** that's been going on since this started, and now THIS? I regret overthinking it. Like I really do.

(The decision felt liberating & great to be honest, like it was finally okay to take off the costume and go back to one of the few things I was decently good at)

______

And you're right. That's just this week.

I have found this war incredibly fascinating to follow, as it seems like on an almost daily basis I get shocked all over again by something I didn't think would happen this century...


What was the point of killing those POWs? Just to be evil a*******?
 

CBH99

Army.ca Veteran
Donor
Reaction score
1,342
Points
1,090
Let's not forget those prisoner's were ordered to surrender because the UN and ICRC promised they would guarantee health and safety of the POWs. Both those organizations have failed in their duties ti these POWs.


Good luck convincing a single Ukrainian to surrender now, or trust the red cross
I don't know if it's a lack of trust in the UN or the ICRC.

Both of those organizations mean well and sincerely have good intentions. I doubt either of those organizations would have expected the Russian government to be as complicit it in these war crimes as they openly are...


It is a d*** good wake up call though. Unless you control the facility, you can't truly guarantee their safety.
 

brihard

Army.ca Fixture
Mentor
Reaction score
5,936
Points
1,110
Amen brother. I came close, but by the time I had made peace with the decision, it had been going on for a few months & I figured it would be over soon. Like Crimea 2.0.

With the extremely long list of list of absolute s*** that's been going on since this started, and now THIS? I regret overthinking it. Like I really do.

(The decision felt liberating & great to be honest, like it was finally okay to take off the costume and go back to one of the few things I was decently good at)

______

And you're right. That's just this week.

I have found this war incredibly fascinating to follow, as it seems like on an almost daily basis I get shocked all over again by something I didn't think would happen this century...


What was the point of killing those POWs? Just to be evil a*******?
Tough to say. There may not necessarily have been a point beyond someone sufficiently senior felt like it. Maybe someone has a half baked notion of a false flag. I dunno.

I would be loath to head blame on ICRC. They’re an excellent organization in the field of international humanitarian law, but they have no coercive capability. They’re at the mercy of the authorities in effective control of the ground on which they wish to operate. If Russia or their proxies choose to deny certain prisoners PW status and the accordant protections, ICRC isn’t really in a position to do much about that. They will also be careful to make too much noise lest they compromise their ability to help the rest. I’m sure word is quietly being passed where it ought to be.
 

brihard

Army.ca Fixture
Mentor
Reaction score
5,936
Points
1,110
eliminate evidence of torture?
Not a particularly good way to do it… Premortem and postmortem wounds are often distinct; a good forensic pathologist, with enough of a body left to examine, would be able to tell the two apart in at least some cases.

I’d like to know the ratio of dead to wounded. An artillery strike on a concrete building will kill some and probably wound a lot more. I bet a suspiciously high proportion are dead.
 

suffolkowner

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
753
Points
1,060
Not a particularly good way to do it… Premortem and postmortem wounds are often distinct; a good forensic pathologist, with enough of a body left to examine, would be able to tell the two apart in at least some cases.

I’d like to know the ratio of dead to wounded. An artillery strike on a concrete building will kill some and probably wound a lot more. I bet a suspiciously high proportion are dead.
probably just thought why not, maybe they had to calibrate the artillery. I doubt anyones going to be looking to hard anytime soon.

This is just the reality of the Russian political/military animal. For them time has not moved on, there are no niceties in war. The strong survive and the weak perish
 

rmc_wannabe

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
2,336
Points
1,310
This is just the reality of the Russian political/military animal. For them time has not moved on, there are no niceties in war. The strong survive and the weak perishbecome complicit
Fixed that for you.

With every concession, half measure, appeasement, delay, dither.... we are complicit in these war crimes.

NATO went full bore in the Balkans (a day late and a dollar short) when this type of barbarism was happening, the only thing keeping us out of Ukraine is a vague threat from a megalomaniac who has called our bluff.

In the end, we have allowed this war of aggression to continue because we are weak. We grew fat and happy with our Peace Dividend and now we're ill prepared for this.
 

CBH99

Army.ca Veteran
Donor
Reaction score
1,342
Points
1,090
It’s actually a very specific threat that the megalomaniac will retaliate with his country’s nuclear arsenal.

In other news, the CAF thinks the cupboards are running empty for his conventional forces.

Here's the thing...

The Kremlin doesn't care. It doesn't care if you call them out, expose their lies, or expose any misinformation they present about their current operations.

They...don't...care...


A Russian embassy just supported supported executing prisoners of war, and made a point of suggesting it be done in a humiliating way.

They bomb shopping malls and schools, knowing full well the International press is in the area.

There are hundreds of intercepted phone calls, Where Russian servicemen brag about the atrocities they commit. The Kremlin hasn't once suggested it is Western propaganda.

________

The West has become a pathetic collection of cowards when it comes to our political leaders.

The leadership being demonstrated by national leaders in Eastern Europe shames us - ambitious yet doable, and done punctually.
 

CBH99

Army.ca Veteran
Donor
Reaction score
1,342
Points
1,090
In all fairness, I think that applies to everybody. What would normally be considered a healthy stockpile for the last few decades would be long gone by now, with Ukraine firing approximately 3000 a month.

Even if nobody has donated any of their own stocks of ammo... in a 1 vs 1 fight against Russia, we'd all be hurting for ammo by now.
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
12,817
Points
1,160
In all fairness, I think that applies to everybody. What would normally be considered a healthy stockpile for the last few decades would be long gone by now, with Ukraine firing approximately 3000 a month.

Even if nobody has donated any of their own stocks of ammo... in a 1 vs 1 fight against Russia, we'd all be hurting for ammo by now.

Welcome to 1915:


Military briefing: is the west running out of ammunition to supply Ukraine?​


“It’s like the first world war’s great shell crisis,” said Shea, recalling a 1915 scandal when massive artillery use in trench warfare depleted British stocks, a shortage that led to high troop casualties and the resignation of prime minister HH Asquith. Ben Wallace, the UK’s defence minister, has said western countries would struggle to wage a protracted war comparable to Russia’s assault on Ukraine as their ammunition stocks “are inadequate for the threats we face”.

During a simulated war game last year, the UK’s ammunition ran out after eight days. No one believes the west is about to exhaust its basic weaponry by supplying Ukraine. Officials say most of the equipment provided to Ukraine remains available or can be swapped out for similar systems. Russia’s defence budget last year of $66bn, even when combined with China’s $293bn of spending, is dwarfed by Nato members’ combined budget of over $1.1tn.

 
Top