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Sexual Misconduct Allegations in The CAF

rmc_wannabe

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"After the apology, she says he asked her if she thought the harassment she experienced was part of a systemic problem. She said yes, and started to cry. Then, she says, he seemed to argue the point, and spoke of his high regard for his own officers. “It was the old, ‘Are you sure? It’s not our guys,’ ” she says. “By the time I was done, it was like, ‘Did you just try to convince me I was wrong? Because I’m not wrong.’ ”

Well it sure as hell wasn't the Easter bunny.....
 

Capt Chaos

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And here's the thing, revealing itself, summed up nicely in a paragraph:

"After the apology, she says he asked her if she thought the harassment she experienced was part of a systemic problem. She said yes, and started to cry. Then, she says, he seemed to argue the point, and spoke of his high regard for his own officers. “It was the old, ‘Are you sure? It’s not our guys,’ ” she says. “By the time I was done, it was like, ‘Did you just try to convince me I was wrong? Because I’m not wrong.’ ”
Classic Rouleau. Gaslight, bully or ignore those that threatened his ego and advancement.
 

daftandbarmy

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Classic Rouleau. Gaslight, bully or ignore those that threatened his ego and advancement.

Based on what I've seen over the past couple of decades or so I honestly think he's not unique, and this is just an example of the corporate culture in action.

Although this can be read as a 'he said, she said' thing, if true, his actions can't be excused but are a good example of what we tolerate in (some of) our senior leaders.
 

MilEME09

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Based on what I've seen over the past couple of decades or so I honestly think he's not unique, and this is just an example of the corporate culture in action.

Although this can be read as a 'he said, she said' thing, if true, his actions can't be excused but are a good example of what we tolerate in (some of) our senior leaders.
It's also likely DND got word of this before it was published which is why he was on indefinite leave after a golf game.
 

rmc_wannabe

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Based on what I've seen over the past couple of decades or so I honestly think he's not unique, and this is just an example of the corporate culture in action.

Although this can be read as a 'he said, she said' thing, if true, his actions can't be excused but are a good example of what we tolerate in (some of) our senior leaders.

I noticed a shift really around the time we were winding down combat operations in Afghanistan. No longer were the best and brightest being called to lead their personnel in an effective manner to save lives and act like a decent human being; it all became about getting your ticket punched and moving along.

I was part of the close out in 2011 and saw a lot of Senior Leaders (both NCO and Officer) who were there to fill an operational role, who were purposefully overlooked on previous Rotos because they were incompetent and a liability. They sucked to work for, made the routine complex, and the complex an exercise in futility and inaction.

But you bet your sweet ass that they had glowing PERs, got those points on their SCRITs and climbed the ladder anyway. They crafted it as such and were deliberate to ensure they walked out of theatre smelling like a daisy. And now this is the template for molding our CWOs and Senior Officers

I often say that we have become a meritocracy much to our own detriment. Doesn't matter if the Sgt or Captain involved is a toxic or incompetent leader; they have a degree, a language profile, and volunteer with Scout's Canada. Their individual achievements outshine their affect (or lack there of) on the institution.

Until we change how we define "effective leadership" we will still have the Rouleaus and Vances of the world sitting in the hot seat.
 

dimsum

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Kilted

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What exactly are they going to do? Walk around and listen in on peoples conversations and tell them that they shouldn't be saying specific things? Are we going to start to see lists of forbidden media (movies, TV shows, music, etc) that are forbidden on ship/base?
 

CBH99

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I noticed a shift really around the time we were winding down combat operations in Afghanistan. No longer were the best and brightest being called to lead their personnel in an effective manner to save lives and act like a decent human being; it all became about getting your ticket punched and moving along.

I was part of the close out in 2011 and saw a lot of Senior Leaders (both NCO and Officer) who were there to fill an operational role, who were purposefully overlooked on previous Rotos because they were incompetent and a liability. They sucked to work for, made the routine complex, and the complex an exercise in futility and inaction.

But you bet your sweet ass that they had glowing PERs, got those points on their SCRITs and climbed the ladder anyway. They crafted it as such and were deliberate to ensure they walked out of theatre smelling like a daisy. And now this is the template for molding our CWOs and Senior Officers

I often say that we have become a meritocracy much to our own detriment. Doesn't matter if the Sgt or Captain involved is a toxic or incompetent leader; they have a degree, a language profile, and volunteer with Scout's Canada. Their individual achievements outshine their affect (or lack there of) on the institution.

Until we change how we define "effective leadership" we will still have the Rouleaus and Vances of the world sitting in the hot seat.
While Rouleau may have put his foot in some muddy waters there, in all fairness I imagine he felt like he had to tap dance through the rain for a while. While the optics of the golf course incident may have looked bad, I do believe him when he said he did want to chat and check on Vance. It's difficult to be the guy in charge of CANSOF, which obviously has an incredibly close relationship to the CDS, MND, and PM posts - and all of a sudden not be able to really communicate with any of his colleagues that he really does NEED to be in contact with.

He owned it, apologized for it. I still have high regards for him. JTF2, CSOR, 427 Sqn, CJIRU - all seem to have done well under his leadership.


0.02
 

daftandbarmy

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I've seen similar initiatives in the provincial government ministries that - for example - have staff from various cultural backgrounds who (apart from their regular full time jobs) can advise leaders on the right way to reach certain groups in the organization.

They also offer services to indigenous people, such as job application assistance, to help remove cultural barriers to accessing public sector jobs: Indigenous Applicant Advisory Service

At the other end of the spectrum there are the 'invigilators of mandatory training' too, I assume, which can backfire e.g.,

Why Cultural Sensitivity Training Is Ineffective and Insensitive

Blogger Susana Rinderle says leadership coaching, better accountability or process improvement may be the answer to your diversity problems, not training.

Cultural sensitivity rubs me wrong because it’s ineffective and even insensitive.

There are three reasons. First, it indirectly calls out a limiting belief that the solution is that “we” need to be more “sensitive” to “them.” This belief is well-intended, but often has negative effects. Typically it carries an unspoken, even unconscious racial tone — a belief that white people need to be more sensitive to people of color, or to a particular racial or ethnic group. It reinforces a perceived or real power imbalance — a notion that the solution to a problem is that I be more sensitive to you. This implies that you are fragile and need to be handled gently so you don’t break. It also implies that the success of our relationship is entirely my responsibility — perhaps because you are incapable of being a full adult or equal partner. My colleague Simma Lieberman makes a strong case for how sensitivity training is patronizing and even damaging to the targets of the sensitivity.

 

Jarnhamar

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What exactly are they going to do? Walk around and listen in on peoples conversations and tell them that they shouldn't be saying specific things? Are we going to start to see lists of forbidden media (movies, TV shows, music, etc) that are forbidden on ship/base?
QR&O 19.14 is the new Heresy charge.

We could give the Culture Officers the power to hold a trial, pass judgement and issue punishment on the spot.
 

McG

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What exactly are they going to do? Walk around and listen in on peoples conversations and tell them that they shouldn't be saying specific things?
Perhaps, as GENADS already do, they will have the job of helping Comds & staff ensure they have considered plans & problems from different perspectives as well as ensuring those same individuals have considered the messages (including unintended ones) that certain decisions/behaviours communicate about what is right.

There is a lot of discussion on organizational cultures where one value is elevated as being paramount to the organization, but reward systems (eg. promotions) reinforce behaviours that are antithetical to the espoused value. We say we put people first, but we often exploit our people to achieve success .. and not for combat but for even just the routine work of the institution. Maybe it would be good to have someone whose job is to inject “hey sir, is this idea really a match with the values the institution claims are important?”
 

rmc_wannabe

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Maybe it would be good to have someone whose job is to inject “hey sir, is this idea really a match with the values the institution claims are important?”
Is that not the responsibility of the Officers and NCOs placed with the sacred duty of Command?

I'm still pretty newly minted as a Sgt, but I have to ask: When does it become the norm that you stop following the Military Ethos and start fucking people about for the hell of it? When does "Never pass a fault" become "meh, it'll do.."? I ask so I know when I'm about to reach that point, I hang up the uniform and find something else to do with my life.

If we need "Culture Officers" to chime in and say "this is a bad call, I don't recommend this COA" for our senior leaders to do the right thing, how in the hell are they still in command? Has no one spoke truth to power about it? If enough people say "This is wrong. We need to rethink this..." should that not suffice?
 

MilEME09

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If we need "Culture Officers" to chime in and say "this is a bad call, I don't recommend this COA" for our senior leaders to do the right thing, how in the hell are they still in command? Has no one spoke truth to power about it? If enough people say "This is wrong. We need to rethink this..." should that not suffice?
Because no one seems to hold senior leaders to account unless it makes the news
 
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