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Search for New Canadian Ranger Rifle (merged)

Ostrozac

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suffolkowner said:
I was under the impression that Colt (Colt Canada?) was partnering with Cooper Arms to provide a rifle?
Doesn't Colt (not Colt Canada) already produce a 7.62 bolt action rifle as well?

You are correct. Colt now offers the M2012 in 308 on their website -- which is produced in partnership with Cooper Firearms.

I hadn't heard of this rifle before today. Based on a press release I found on the Colt website, it looks like this was rolled out this past September. It looks like MSRP starts at around $2700, so it's more expensive than something like a Ruger.
 

Cdn Blackshirt

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Civvie Question:  How does the contract work with Colt Canada?  They have an exclusive term for manufacture and maintenance of all infantry weapons?  Can someone elaborate?


Thanks in advance, Matthew
 

Fishbone Jones

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Ostrozac said:
You are correct. Colt now offers the M2012 in 308 on their website -- which is produced in partnership with Cooper Firearms.

I hadn't heard of this rifle before today. Based on a press release I found on the Colt website, it looks like this was rolled out this past September. It looks like MSRP starts at around $2700, so it's more expensive than something like a Ruger.

It's more expensive than their AR-15.
 

Fabius

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I had not heard of the M2012 either until just now.

My initial impression is that it is designed and built to perform the role of a long range precision rifle. Given that assumption the $2700 dollar bill is not actually that different from what a lot of other higher end precision / semi custom guns would run. 



 

daftandbarmy

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Canadian Rangers' 67-year-old rifles kept in original boxes: document

FORT SMITH, N.W.T. - Like any true collector's item, the Cold War-era rifles still used today by the Canadian Rangers come in their original boxes.Prime Minister Stephen Harper was assured in a newly released memo that the Lee Enfield weapons, which were purchased in 1947, are in mint condition."While Rangers are given rifles in pristine condition (i.e. new from the box from special storage), Canada's stock is diminishing and a replacement needs to be identified within the next four to five years," says the memo, which was sent to Harper last October.The Canadian Press obtained the memo under the Access to Information Act.The prime minister, who is on his annual tour of the North, is no stranger to the rifles. During last year's visit, Harper got down on the ground, sniper-style, and fired off a few shots during target practice with the Rangers.The Lee Enfield rifles are standard-issue weapons for the roughly 5,000 reservists scattered across 200 communities who comprise the Rangers. The weapons work well in the North because they don't freeze up or jam.But the military has for years been trying to replace them because there are so few manufacturers left who make spare parts for the rifles, first introduced to the British Army in 1895.Harper himself has acknowledged the weapons should be replaced."I am told there is no difficulty in servicing the weapons at this time, but this is a concern and we believe is it time," he said a year ago in Hay River, N.W.T."The Department of National Defence is in the process of scoping out the program for replacement and I expect that to happen over the next few years."The replacement weapons probably won't be that much different from the 67-year-old Lee Enfields, says the memo to Harper."It is important to note that despite the date of manufacture, rifle technology has not changed significantly over the past 60 years and the replacement rifle will likely be very similar to the Lee Enfield."The Prime Minister's Office has said the government plans to begin replacing the rifles in 2016.In 2011, Public Works put out a call to companies for specifications for 10,000 replacement rifles, but defence industry sources have said that the program has been held up over concern about who holds the design rights on certain weapons.The Canadian Forces did not immediately respond to questions about the rifles. - See more at: http://www.timescolonist.com/canadian-rangers-67-year-old-rifles-kept-in-original-boxes-document-1.1325822#sthash.w4ugIPvo.dpuf

http://www.timescolonist.com/canadian-rangers-67-year-old-rifles-kept-in-original-boxes-document-1.1325822#sthash.w4ugIPvo.dpuf

 

The Bread Guy

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Next step:  Colt Canada issuing RFP
.... Canada intends to sole source the manufacturing of the New Canadian Ranger Rifle (NCRR)through a Manufacturing Licence Agreement to Colt Canada under the auspices of the MSP (Munitions Supply Program) .... Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) would like to advise interested rifle and ancillary equipment Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) that the Request For Proposal (RFP) for the New Canadian Ranger Rifle has been posted on MERX by Colt Canada ....
This, from Colt Canada:
.... The Government of Canada and the Department of National Defence with Colt Canada, under the Munitions Supply Program (MSP) will replace the original Lee Enfield rifle fleet with a commercially available hunting rifle. The replacement will be a calibre .308 Winchester, bolt action, magazine fed rifle. Ancillary items, such as a sling, cleaning kit, trigger lock, soft case and hard case for each rifle will be procured at the same time. Rifles and each ancillary item are considered to be separate biddable entities.

This is a Request For Proposal (RFP) and individual bidders for the rifle replacement or each ancillary item will provide the Government of Canada, through Colt Canada with samples, (15 rifles, 5 of each ancillary item) for test and evaluation. The main document is "NCRR Bid Package August 2014" followed by Annexes A through M.

The issuance of this RFP is not to be considered in any way as a commitment by the Government of Canada or Colt Canada, or as authority to undertake any work which could be charged to Canada or Colt Canada ....
More from proposed Colt specs here (32pg PDF via Dropbox.com).

And this from Metroland News:
After decades of service, the military’s last Lee-Enfield rifles are finally getting close to retirement.

Colt Canada of Kitchener has been picked to design modern rifles to replace the vintage firearms used by the Canadian Rangers.

The military will get a chance to test out 125 of the new weapons next summer during its annual Operation Nanook training exercise ....
 

KevinB

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Not one to nitpick, but...

Who wants to give Colt Canada their TDP.

The CAF will never buy enough guns for anyone to warrant giving a TDP up to CC.  Back when it was Diemaco a part of DH Aero and a large CF rifle contract it made sense, now with Colt Defense buying them and making it Colt Canada, your just making CC smarter, and Gary C and the boys there are plenty smart on their own.

 

jpjohnsn

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Colin P said:
I shudder to think what they will do with those surplus Lee-Enfields.
Personally, I'm hoping that some of them get set aside for cadet use - either as DPs or brought back for use in large bore training.  DPs, in particular, are hard to come by at the corps/squadron level. 
 

Lightguns

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Colin P said:
I shudder to think what they will do with those surplus Lee-Enfields.

Canadian law requires us to cut em up as I recall unless the Government has a use for them as military aid to a friendly nation.
 

BadgerTrapper

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Colin P said:
I shudder to think what they will do with those surplus Lee-Enfields.

Is there any legislation or paperwork stating that they cannot be sold for civilian acquisition? I'd love to acquire a couple more Lee-Enfields for parts. Maybe even finally attempt to have a Tanker made. One can only hope.
 

Colin Parkinson

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Lightguns said:
Canadian law requires us to cut em up as I recall unless the Government has a use for them as military aid to a friendly nation.

laws can be changed if MP's and Ministers get enough letters
 

GAP

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Colin P said:
I shudder to think what they will do with those surplus Lee-Enfields.

Arm the polar bears....the WWF isn't cutting it!!
 

The Bread Guy

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Colin P said:
laws can be changed if MP's and Ministers get enough letters, or if they want to in spite of a lot of letters
FTFY - I know, so young to be so cynical I be  ;)

GAP said:
Arm the polar bears....the WWF isn't cutting it!!
:rofl:
 

daftandbarmy

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I'm no expert in Polar Bear busting, but isn't .308 a little on the small side?
 

dapaterson

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Lightguns said:
Canadian law requires us to cut em up as I recall unless the Government has a use for them as military aid to a friendly nation.

I'm curious - what legislation or regulation specifies this?
 

The Bread Guy

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Lightguns said:
Canadian law requires us to cut em up as I recall unless the Government has a use for them as military aid to a friendly nation.
Makes you wonder what kind of "friend" Canada would be seen to be giving bolt-action rifles from WW2 to a country we want to "help".
 

cphansen

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I've been going thru this thread and am absolutely amazed that no one has stated the obvious answer'
What the Canadian Rangers need in a new rifle is the same thing they need in an old rifle.

They need bullets, without bullets the rifle is just an ineffective club, they might as well just throw snowballs, they'll be just as effective as a bullet less rifle.
 

Scoobie Newbie

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We have lots of bullets.

SherH2A said:
I've been going thru this thread and am absolutely amazed that no one has stated the obvious answer'
What the Canadian Rangers need in a new rifle is the same thing they need in an old rifle.

They need bullets, without bullets the rifle is just an ineffective club, they might as well just throw snowballs, they'll be just as effective as a bullet less rifle.
 
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