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Pan-Islamic merged mega thread

Oldgateboatdriver

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Is it just me, or is this quote from the news report a little weird?

"Associated Press photographer Massoud Hossaini said he was in a classroom with 15 students when he heard an explosion on the southern flank of the campus."

I mean: You just have to know you are in a combat zone when your University has a "flank" instead of  a "side" or "boundary" or "border" or "campus line" or "campus limits"
 

Oldgateboatdriver

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Don't think so. Even in French "flanc" has a definite military connotation - not a term you would ever use to talk about limits or edges of a campus. Heck, you would not even use that term to talk about a military base, unless it was an actual fort.
 

McG

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Oldgateboatdriver said:
Don't think so. Even in French "flanc" has a definite military connotation - not a term you would ever use to talk about limits or edges of a campus. Heck, you would not even use that term to talk about a military base, unless it was an actual fort.
But is there a distinction in Dari or Pashto?
 

The Bread Guy

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Also keep in mind that if it's written in the text of a news story, but not in quotes, it's the person who wrote the story (or maybe even their editor) who chose the word to paraphrase, not necessarily the speaker. 
 

Lumber

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I think the writer of that headline is getting a little too excited about the idea of writing about war. He may not be old enough to realize it's not all fun and headshots.
 

The Bread Guy

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MarkOttawa said:
Globe and Mail July 2:

Bangladeshi terror group affiliated with IS reportedly led by Canadian

Islamic State militants have claimed responsibility for the attack in Dhaka, but authorities are still investigating who led the hostage-taking that resulted in at least 20 deaths.

One of the likely suspects: a terrorist group in Bangladesh that is affiliated with IS and is reportedly led by a Canadian.

Tamim Chowdhury, who goes by Shaykh Abu Ibrahim al-Hanif, is a Bangladeshi-Canadian who is leading a militant arm with close ties to Islamic State, according to the Bangladeshi newspaper The Daily Star.

Mr. Chowdhury is also connected with an IS study group, which cited him as the leader of the Bangladeshi IS effort. In the April issue of Daqbi, a glossy magazine published by Islamic State, Mr. Chowdhury called for a united country free of “deviant sects, who are busy misleading the masses.” The magazine identified Mr. Chowdhury as the “emir,” or ruler, of its Bangladesh branch.

“I know that he’s from Windsor,” said Amarnath Amarasingam, a post-doctoral fellow in the Resilience Research Centre at Dalhousie University who specializes in radicalization and terrorism. “I know he’s the head of the ISIS group, or at least a pro-ISIS group, in Bangladesh.”

Mr. Amarasingam said Mr. Chowdhury’s name came up repeatedly during his research in the community…
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/bangladeshi-terror-group-affiliated-with-is-reportedly-led-by-canadian/article30733718/
An update ...
Bangladesh security forces killed three Islamist militants on Saturday, including a Bangladesh-born Canadian citizen accused of masterminding an attack on a cafe in Dhaka last month that killed 22 people, mostly foreigners, police said.

The militants were cornered in a hideout on the outskirts of the capital and, having refused to surrender, were killed in the ensuing gunbattle, Monirul Islam, the head of the Dhaka police counterterrorism unit, told Reuters.

He initially said four militants had been killed but later revised the number to three.

(...)

The suspected mastermind killed in Saturday's raid was identified as Tamim Ahmed Chowdhury, a 30-year-old Canadian citizen born in Bangladesh. Analysts say Islamic State in April identified Chowdhury as its national commander.

"According to our evidence we are now sure that Tamim was among the three killed," Home Minister Asaduzzaman Khan told reporters. "So the chapter of Tamim has ended here." ...
hqdefault.jpg
 

a_majoor

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BBC publishes a smuggled diary from Mosul:

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-37411167

Mosul: Smuggled diary reveals life of fear under IS
By Nafiseh Kohnavard
BBC Persian
22 September 2016

"Ahmed" was an engineering student at Mosul University when so-called Islamic State (IS) militants stormed into the city in June 2014. From that day, everything changed.

The university shut and life became a daily struggle to survive. This summer, after two years, Ahmed (not his real name) managed to escape. In the weeks before, at great personal risk, he secretly kept a diary of living in the shadow of death under IS.
Ahmed has shared his diary exclusively with the BBC. Here are some excerpts documenting one week.

Monday: 'They kill anyone'

Today I met a smuggler. In the next few days I'm hoping to escape. I'm a bit scared because the road isn't 100 per cent safe. If we meet any Isis [IS] fighters along the way we'll be in big trouble. But we have people there. They will give us a signal when the road is safe. So wish me luck!

Life under Isis is not good at all. Men aren't allowed to cut their beards and they have to shorten their trousers. You shouldn't smoke cigarettes. Women have to wear the niqab and cover their hands. In addition they have banned the internet at home and phone calls.

They're stopping people watching TV because they say most satellite channels are against Muslims. But everyone knows it's because they want to cover up their losses. Anyone who breaks the rules is beaten and goes to prison. You have to pay money to get out.

When Isis took over Mosul in 2014 no-one knew who they were. We thought they were tribal militants resisting the suffering caused by the Iraqi army. But then they proclaimed the caliphate and started imposing strict laws on people, and discontent started spreading.

Now everyone knows who they are. They're all about personal interest. They kill anyone who opposes their ideas. They've destroyed the historical monuments in the city. Now people have rejected them and are waiting for the Iraqi army to liberate them.

Tuesday: 'No work, no pay'

This morning my friend went out shopping and saw Isis executing three people because they'd been talking about Isis losses. It's really shocking to hear news like that. They're robbing people of their lives for trivial reasons. They are twisting the word of God for their own interests.

In the past I used to go out with my friends to the cafes, to play football, or study together. But now most of the places we used to go are shut down. When I go out I try to be careful and not to go too far from home or to public places because it's unsafe there.

Today my mother made some delicious cookies for us. You can sometimes buy the ingredients on the market, but they're expensive. People here survive on local products which they grow themselves. It's quite easy to get vegetables but it's very difficult to get flour, sugar and rice because it's expensive. People don't have money. There's no work, no salaries.

Wednesday: 'Taking our houses'

Today I really missed my university. I used to go there and see my friends. But after Isis came everything changed. They made it a meeting place for their leaders. They also used the labs and warehouses to produce and store booby traps. As a result, coalition aircraft bombed all the main buildings and the university was reduced to rubble. I was so sad that day.

Isis have begun to confiscate some of the houses in our town because the owners have left. They've given them to their fighters. They exploit the presence of civilians, to stop them being targeted by coalition aircraft.

Many homes have been bombed by the coalition after they were seized by Isis. This makes people worry and despair. Isis don't care about people. On the contrary they wish for coalition air raids in order to incite people against the coalition. But people know this now.

Thursday: Hiding phones

Isis have been carrying out house-to-house searches. They're looking for mobile phones. They're trying to find out who is in contact with the coalition. They arrested a man because they found a phone in his pocket.

I have taken measures to hide my phone in a secret place. We don't feel safe even inside our homes. If they find a phone in your pocket, you are dead. When you carry a phone in your pocket you feel like you are carrying a nuclear weapon.

Friday: 'Really tense'

Today I went to the mosque. Isis tried to persuade people to join them, but no-one cares. Today I felt confused. Do I stay here and wait for the arrival of Iraqi forces, or do I risk it and escape from Isis?

I want to escape but I won't be better off, because Iraqi forces will put me in a camp. No-one is allowed to leave the camp unless you have a sponsor - either a Kurd or someone from the government.

The situation is really tense here now. I hope that in the coming days the road will be safe and I will be able to escape from Isis because I can't bear the situation here any longer.

Days after this final diary entry Ahmed managed to escape. He is now living in another Iraqi city and is resuming his studies. His family remain in Mosul.
{/quote]
 

CougarKing

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Centuries after the Sunni-Shia Schism, little has changed:

Reuters

Top Saudi cleric says Iran leaders not Muslims as haj row mounts
By: Sami Aboudi, Reuters
September 7, 2016 7:28 PM

DUBAI - Saudi Arabia's top religious authority said Iran's leaders were not Muslims, drawing a rebuke from Tehran in an unusually harsh exchange between the regional rivals over the running of the annual haj pilgrimage.

The war of words on the eve of the mass pilgrimage will deepen a long-running rift between the Sunni kingdom and the Shi'ite revolutionary power. They back opposing sides in Syria's civil war and a list of other conflicts across the Middle East.

Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, in a message published on Monday, criticized Saudi Arabia over how it runs the haj after a crush last year killed hundreds of pilgrims. He said Saudi authorities had "murdered" some of them, describing Saudi rulers as godless and irreligious.

(...SNIPPED)

And the proxy war in Syria continues:

Reuters

Gulf states may arm Syrian rebels after truce collapse
By: Jonathan Landay and Arshad Mohammed, Reuters
September 27, 2016 8:50 AM

WASHINGTON -- The collapse of the latest Syria ceasefire has heightened the possibility that Gulf states might arm Syrian rebels with shoulder-fired missiles to defend themselves against Syrian and Russian warplanes, US officials said on Monday.

Still, the US administration continues to maintain that negotiations are the only way to end the carnage after Russian-backed Syrian forces intensified their bombing of Aleppo, the last major urban area in rebel hands.

The latest US attempt to end Syria's 5-1/2 year civil war was shattered on Sept. 19 when a humanitarian aid convoy was bombed in an attack Washington blamed on Russian aircraft. Moscow denied involvement.

(...SNIPPED)

 
J

jollyjacktar

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My kind of Grannie.

'I beheaded them, I cooked their heads, I burned their bodies': The 'housewife' militia leader and grandmother who tops ISIS's most wanted list in Iraq

-Wahida Mohamed has been fighting Islamic fundamentalists in Iraq since 2004
-The 39-year-old grandmother's husband, father and brother were killed by ISIS, and she has survived six assassination attempts
-Her Facebook page shows graphic images of dead enemies
-She commands a 70-strong militia group in Shirqat and helped drive ISIS terrorists away 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3813316/I-beheaded-cooked-heads-burned-bodies-housewife-militia-leader-grandmother-tops-ISIS-s-wanted-list-Iraq.html#ixzz4LfGf9Pcu
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
 
J

jollyjacktar

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She's making sure they won't make it to Paradise at any rate.  That's really got to get into the heads of the living dickheads left.
 

Colin Parkinson

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the video is not clear, but a anti-ship missile vessel a high speed catamaran  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieVFTHrsxh8
 
J

jollyjacktar

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Bwahahahahaha what a bunch of fucking wankers.  :rofl:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3819905/16-ISIS-fighters-killed-faulty-suicide-vest-goes-meeting-attack-Iraq.html
 

The Bread Guy

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milnews.ca said:
An update ...
Bangladesh security forces killed three Islamist militants on Saturday, including a Bangladesh-born Canadian citizen accused of masterminding an attack on a cafe in Dhaka last month that killed 22 people, mostly foreigners, police said.

The militants were cornered in a hideout on the outskirts of the capital and, having refused to surrender, were killed in the ensuing gunbattle, Monirul Islam, the head of the Dhaka police counterterrorism unit, told Reuters.

He initially said four militants had been killed but later revised the number to three.

(...)

The suspected mastermind killed in Saturday's raid was identified as Tamim Ahmed Chowdhury, a 30-year-old Canadian citizen born in Bangladesh. Analysts say Islamic State in April identified Chowdhury as its national commander.

"According to our evidence we are now sure that Tamim was among the three killed," Home Minister Asaduzzaman Khan told reporters. "So the chapter of Tamim has ended here." ...
A bit more detail from the bad guys themselves ...
Six weeks after a Canadian terrorist leader was killed by security forces in Bangladesh, ISIL has released what it said was his account of how his group attacked a Dhaka restaurant popular among foreigners.

The Holey Artisan Bakery “was selected for this blessed operation because it was well-known for being frequented by the citizens of the Crusader countries,” Tamim Chowdhury wrote in the ISIL magazine Rumiyah.

Posted online Tuesday, it was the first acknowledgement from ISIL that Chowdhury, 30, was the head of “military and covert operations” in Bangladesh. The former Windsor resident died when police raided a Dhaka apartment on Aug. 27 ...
If you want to read Daesh's account, you can download a PDF of the story (4 pages) in English at a non-terrorist site here.
 

a_majoor

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With Russia's victory in Syria, the traditional American policy of supporting the Sunni Kingdoms to ensure stability is in ruins, and the Obama policy of supporting the Shiites also has collapsed due to the inherent incoherence and incredibly inept execution. The future of the Middle East should involve us drawing down and allowing the four regional hegemonic powers to fight it out: Iran, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and (to a lesser extent) Egypt. If Russia would like to spend blood and treasure in the Mddle East, they should be welcome to do so.



Syria’s Civil War Is Over—Russia Won
It’s time to accept the painful reality of Syria’s fratricide
By John R. Schindler • 10/26/16 10:45am

It’s not every day an American presidential candidate flatly says his opponent will cause World War Three. But Donald Trump did just that yesterday, accusing Hillary Clinton of recklessly seeking confrontation with Russia over Syria—where, he claims, the Democratic nominee is insufficiently worried about the Islamic State.

“What we should do is focus on ISIS. We should not be focusing on Syria,” Trump stated in Florida at his Trump National Doral golf resort. “You’re going to end up in World War Three over Syria if we listen to Hillary Clinton.” He then hinted at possible nuclear Armageddon caused by Hillary’s recklessness.

That’s strong stuff, even for Trump, and it’s impossible to miss that, yet again, the GOP nominee is parroting the Kremlin’s foreign policy line, essentially verbatim. That Washington is fighting the wrong people in Syria is a standard Russian trope. According to Vladimir Putin, the Americans are supporting terrorists in Syria at the expense of the country’s government, led by Bashar al-Assad, who happens to be Moscow’s client. In recent months, the Kremlin has breathed fire, issuing warning after warning to Washington to stay away from further involvement in that country’s awful civil war, which has raged for more than five years now.

Earlier this month, Russia’s defense ministry, which has reinforced its air defenses in Syria with very modern S-300 and S-400 missiles—although ISIS has no airplanes—bluntly informed the Pentagon that any efforts by the U.S. Air Force to bomb targets in Syria without Moscow’s approval will be met with force, without delay or hesitation.

Moscow is now practically egging on the Americans. And why not? In Syria, Putin has achieved his strategic aims of saving the Assad regime while painting the West as inept villains who back jihadists. President Obama’s confident prediction that Moscow’s Syrian intervention would find the same quagmires his White House has abetted in Iraq and Afghanistan was badly wrong. For the Kremlin, shooting down American warplanes would be the crowning glory of Russia’s Levantine expedition, which has exceeded strategic expectations at limited cost to Moscow.

The Pentagon is well aware that the Russian military would greet a confrontation in Syria with glee. We need to accept strategic reality, now. While many American politicos and foreign policy mavens—importantly Hillary Clinton is among them—advocate a No-Fly Zone in Syria to prevent the Assad regime and its Russian allies from using airpower to kill civilians, the reality is that an NFZ already exists in Syria. It’s supplied by the Russians.

If Hillary Clinton becomes president, she would be well advised to admit what her predecessor did in Syria and what it means for the region and the world.

Payback is an underestimated reality in international relations, and for the Kremlin, putting the Americans in their place in Syria is unquestionably a delicious feast. Revenge served cold is still sweet. Putin and his retinue crave retribution against the West generally and the United States particularly, for a multitude of alleged occidental sins, and Syria since 2011 has been an ideal proving-ground for Russian retribution.

Similarities between Syria and Yugoslavia are unavoidable, and nobody in Moscow seeks to avoid them. Both were unnatural, ethnically and religiously diverse states cobbled together by the victorious Allies after World War One, really no more than lines on the wrong map held together by unpleasant dictatorial regimes, and both collapsed in war and genocide.

Yugoslavia fell apart exactly 20 years before Syria did, but the conflicts that resulted appear similar: a brutal mishmash of warring groups, many motivated by religious and ethnic extremism, that are unconcerned about civilian dead. The big difference now, a generation later, is that Russia is in a position to change the conflict’s outcome.

Moscow, reeling from its Cold War defeat and the subsequent collapse of the Soviet empire, was impotent to save Yugoslavia from Western aggression—to use Russian terms. Indeed, the dismantling of Yugoslavia by NATO stands as a lesson to Putin about what neoliberal imperialists named Clinton will do to weaker states.

The fate of Yugoslavia in the 1990s—including the fact that significant chunks of that former country remain under NATO and European Union occupation today—is a cautionary tale for the Kremlin, and Putin has spoken passionately about how he will never allow Russia to be dismantled by the West like Yugoslavia was. He pointedly defended his 2014 seizure of Crimea from Ukraine by noting that redrawing Europe’s map—Putin cited NATO’s 1999 bombing of Serbia that achieved Kosovo’s independence from Belgrade—was acceptable when the West did it.

For Putin, his Syrian intervention has been an unambiguous win on the world stage. Its benefits exist on many levels, not least Russia’s reinforcing the potent message that Moscow, unlike Washington, stands by its friends. When his regime was collapsing in 2011, Hosni Mubarak, who had led Egypt for three decades as a loyal ally of America, was coldly abandoned by the White House. President Obama, against the advice of his own national security experts, cut Mubarak loose to the mob, refusing to take his panicked phone calls pleading for help.

That same year, when his regime was facing the abyss as civil war enveloped Syria, Bashar al-Assad got all the help he wanted from Moscow. Russia saved Assad and has not cared one whit about cries from the international community and NGOs about the brutal methods employed by the Syrian regime against rebels. This message has not been missed in the Middle East. It’s no wonder that even Israel has sought parley with Moscow, which has replaced Washington as the new regional kingmaker-cum-sheriff, while Egypt has renewed security ties with the Kremlin that Cairo abandoned more than four decades ago, in favor of the Americans. No more.

Putin and his ministers have acted cynically and cunningly in Syria, to good effect for Russia. However, it would be wrong to portray Moscow as strategic geniuses here. It’s much more about the staggering, unprecedented foreign policy incompetence of President Obama and his White House than anything else. Time and again, Obama and his coterie of self-proclaimed foreign policy masterminds on his National Security Council have been bested by the Russians, who view them with undisguised contempt.

The critical moment came slightly more than three years ago, in September 2013, when Obama walked away from his own “redline” in Syria over Assad’s use of chemical weapons against rebels. I never favored American military intervention in that civil war – seeing the incompetent hash Washington made of Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya I knew the disasters that would likely follow – but I strongly believed that the global hegemon’s word had to be honored. If Obama said it was a redline, he had to mean it. Alas, he did not. As I explained at the time, outsourcing American policy in Syria to the Russians was sure to end in tears and diplomatic defeat with wider consequences.

Predictably, Obama’s defenders in the media proclaimed the president’s redline decision an act of geopolitical genius that mere mortals couldn’t comprehend. Nevertheless, empowering the Kremlin in Syria would have lasting effects far beyond the Levant, as I predicted at the time. Just six months later, Putin seized Ukraine then invaded the east of that country. Russia was back, on the march—and seeking confrontation with the West.

We should not lose sight of the human cost of this tragic folly. Something approaching half a million people have been killed, most of them civilians, in Syria’s fratricide, which Obama says he’s pretty upset about—as well he should be. There’s ample schadenfreude here, not least the key role played by Samantha Power, one of Obama’s top foreign policy players (she’s currently our ambassador to the United Nations). Having won a Pulitzer Prize for her book, written fresh out of Yale, castigating Bill Clinton’s administration and American “impotence” in the Balkans in the 1990s that enabled genocide, as one of Obama’s mavens Power has delivered a far greater humanitarian catastrophe in Syria than anything that happened in Bosnia or Kosovo.

Syria’s civil war will linger, probably for years. Innocents will keep dying. Significant parts of the country will remain outside the control of Damascus and its Russian and Iranian allies. However, the Assad regime has prevailed, thanks to Moscow. It will survive and the Middle Eastern balance of power has shifted to Russia’s advantage. If Hillary Clinton becomes president in January, as looks likely, she would be well advised to admit what her predecessor did in Syria and what it means for the region and the world. She would be very foolish to give Vladimir Putin a military confrontation in Syria that he actually wants.
 

Humphrey Bogart

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Thucydides said:
With Russia's victory in Syria, the traditional American policy of supporting the Sunni Kingdoms to ensure stability is in ruins, and the Obama policy of supporting the Shiites also has collapsed due to the inherent incoherence and incredibly inept execution. The future of the Middle East should involve us drawing down and allowing the four regional hegemonic powers to fight it out: Iran, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and (to a lesser extent) Egypt. If Russia would like to spend blood and treasure in the Mddle East, they should be welcome to do so.

The article you posted reads like a bunch of incoherent blabbering.  On one hand we should smash the Assad Regime, on the other hand, we should draw down and let the Arabs smash each other? 

The only real message in the article is "Obama is incompetent" although the author can't actually make a coherent argument as to why he thinks so. 

The strategy employed by the US to defeat ISIS is a good one and it's working, at very little cost to the US in blood or treasure.  The Assad Regime is now in control of what amounts to little more than a rump state and they've got no more chemical weapons which is very good news for Israel.  We've got Muslims fighting radical Muslims which is good news for us and Iranian nuclear ambitions have been ratcheted back?  So what exactly is the problem? 
 

The Bread Guy

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Humphrey Bogart said:
The article you posted reads like a bunch of incoherent blabbering.  On one hand we should smash the Assad Regime, on the other hand, we should draw down and let the Arabs smash each other? 

The only real message in the article is "Obama is incompetent" although the author can't actually make a coherent argument as to why he thinks so ...
Funny that, given who the publisher of the site posting said article is in his other life ...
 
J

jollyjacktar

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I can't say I feel really sorry about this.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3945566/ISIS-teenage-Cub-Caliphate-kills-entire-family-suicide-belt-accidentally-goes-home-Mosul.html?login#readerCommentsCommand-message-field
 

Journeyman

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jollyjacktar said:
I can't say I feel really sorry about this.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3945566/ISIS-teenage-Cub-Caliphate-kills-entire-family-suicide-belt-accidentally-goes-home-Mosul.html?login#readerCommentsCommand-message-field
Ah, al-Darwin  at work.  ;D
 
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