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Defending Canadian Arctic Sovereignty

FJAG

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Continuing GR66's thought on alliances

185 Reserve Units
190 Ranger Patrols
I know that the 185 Reserve Units comes from an older CAF webpage but I think it's completely out to lunch.

The Army P Res has 115 Bn sized units (including arty, engr, sigs and service bns) and 10 Independent coys sized elements (incl arty and int) that may have unit status. There are an additional 4 MP Regiments and 15 H Svcs PRes units which do not belong to the Army. After that you have to start looking at 24 NavRes division and 3 AirRes squadrons and four flights. All of that combined isn't 185 Res F units

I'm not so sure of why you wish to share the misery joy of creating a large force of paid and unpaid personnel to take on both military and para or quasi military responsibilities when we can barely maintain 19,000 paid ones.

Japan is an excellent example of how the civilian population and volunteers are integrated into natural disaster programs. Canada has both federal and provincial Emergency Management organizations. It would behoove our government to leverage those systems with increased specialized and general service volunteers tailored to the most likely disasters specific to each district/region.

I know the Res F has once again started dabbling in the snakes and ladders field (I'm a victim and survivor of the 1960s Militia debacle) and quite frankly I'm agin' it. The Res F has little enough time and resources to become proficient in its military roles much less the personnel training and logistic requirements of HADR including the cat herding 90,000 volunteers. If the Army wants the Res F to be a pseudo ARNG then get them properly organized, equipped and trained in their military roles first.

The way the P Res functions now is dysfunctional. The suggested method is not only impractical but would gut any possibility of creating truly operational units. Sorry, IMHO, its a solution looking for a problem based on some vague European Landwehr concept that has basically died out.

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daftandbarmy

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I know that the 185 Reserve Units comes from an older CAF webpage but I think it's completely out to lunch.

The Army P Res has 115 Bn sized units (including arty, engr, sigs and service bns) and 10 Independent coys sized elements (incl arty and int) that may have unit status. There are an additional 4 MP Regiments and 15 H Svcs PRes units which do not belong to the Army. After that you have to start looking at 24 NavRes division and 3 AirRes squadrons and four flights. All of that combined isn't 185 Res F units

I'm not so sure of why you wish to share the misery joy of creating a large force of paid and unpaid personnel to take on both military and para or quasi military responsibilities when we can barely maintain 19,000 paid ones.

Japan is an excellent example of how the civilian population and volunteers are integrated into natural disaster programs. Canada has both federal and provincial Emergency Management organizations. It would behoove our government to leverage those systems with increased specialized and general service volunteers tailored to the most likely disasters specific to each district/region.

I know the Res F has once again started dabbling in the snakes and ladders field (I'm a victim and survivor of the 1960s Militia debacle) and quite frankly I'm agin' it. The Res F has little enough time and resources to become proficient in its military roles much less the personnel training and logistic requirements of HADR including the cat herding 90,000 volunteers. If the Army wants the Res F to be a pseudo ARNG then get them properly organized, equipped and trained in their military roles first.

The way the P Res functions now is dysfunctional. The suggested method is not only impractical but would gut any possibility of creating truly operational units. Sorry, IMHO, its a solution looking for a problem based on some vague European Landwehr concept that has basically died out.

🍻

Over the past couple of decades the Reserves have already responded, admirably apparently, to a variety of OP LENTUS type domestic response operations.

There are always improvements that can be made, but are you sure we're not trying to fix a problem that doesn't exist... much?
 

FJAG

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Over the past couple of decades the Reserves have already responded, admirably apparently, to a variety of OP LENTUS type domestic response operations.

There are always improvements that can be made, but are you sure we're not trying to fix a problem that doesn't exist... much?
That's kind of where I am.

I think the Res F is doing enough (maybe even a bit much) for Op LENTUS without needing to do a whole lot of specialized preparation. Similarly I think they're doing enough in the way of Arctic response companies.

Where I don't think they are doing too well is in the preparation for general combat functions and that is a function of middlin' leadership, lack of equipment, inadequate organization and much wasted training time.

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Colin Parkinson

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Good to see some long term thinking and work going on, short term pain for long term gain hopefully.
 

daftandbarmy

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Good to see some long term thinking and work going on, short term pain for long term gain hopefully.

Meanwhile, in the USA:

Everything In The $1 Trillion Infrastructure Bill: New Roads, Electric School Buses, Great Lakes Restoration And More​


The House passed one of the largest infrastructure packages in U.S. history Friday night after months of bipartisan negotiations and tense political infighting, shoring up $1.2 trillion in funds, including $550 billion in new investments, for the nation's bridges, airports, waterways, public transit and more—here's everything you need to know about where the massive spending will go.

Roads and bridges: Headlining the 2,702-page bill's spending, roughly $110 billion of new funds would go toward improving the nation's roads and bridges, and investments in other major transportation programs.

Public transit: The package also includes the largest-ever federal investment in public transit, allotting $39 billion to modernize systems, improve access for the elderly and people with disabilities, and repair more than 24,000 buses, 5,000 rail cars and thousands of miles of train tracks.

Amtrak: The legislation marks the largest investment in passenger rail since the creation of Amtrak 50 years ago, with $66 billion earmarked for high-speed rail, safety improvements, Amtrak grants and to modernize the rail route connecting Washington, D.C., to Boston.

Broadband internet: Tacking on to billions authorized by last year's American Rescue Plan, the infrastructure bill includes $65 billion to bolster the country's broadband infrastructure and help ensure every American has access to high-speed internet, with one in four households expected to be eligible for a $30-per-month subsidy to pay for internet.

Electric grid: Though many clean-energy measures were cut from the bill to satisfy spending-weary lawmakers, a $65 billion investment will help upgrade the nation's electricity grid, with thousands of miles of new transmission lines and funds for environmentally friendly smart-grid technology.

Electric cars, buses and ferries: In addition to $7.5 billion for the nation's first network of electric-vehicle chargers along highway corridors, lawmakers have shored up $5 billion for zero-emission buses (including thousands of electric school buses) and $2.5 billion for ferries.
Clean drinking water: Following high-profile water-supply crises plaguing cities like Flint, Michigan, the legislation includes a provision for $55 billion to replace all the nation's lead pipes and service lines, representing the largest investment in clean drinking water ever.
Great rivers and lakes: Among the bill's $48 billion for water infrastructure improvements, about $1 billion is slated to go toward the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, a sweeping clean-up measure targeting toxic hot spots—or areas of heavy industrial pollution—around the Great Lakes region.

Airports: More than $25 billion has been allocated to help modernize America's airports—funds the Airports Council International says will help tackle more than $115 billion worth of project backlogs.

Road safety: The deal invests $11 billion in transportation safety programs, including a new program to help states and localities reduce crashes and fatalities in their communities, particularly among cyclists and pedestrians.


 

Kirkhill

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Meanwhile, in the USA:

Everything In The $1 Trillion Infrastructure Bill: New Roads, Electric School Buses, Great Lakes Restoration And More​


The House passed one of the largest infrastructure packages in U.S. history Friday night after months of bipartisan negotiations and tense political infighting, shoring up $1.2 trillion in funds, including $550 billion in new investments, for the nation's bridges, airports, waterways, public transit and more—here's everything you need to know about where the massive spending will go.

Roads and bridges: Headlining the 2,702-page bill's spending, roughly $110 billion of new funds would go toward improving the nation's roads and bridges, and investments in other major transportation programs.

Public transit: The package also includes the largest-ever federal investment in public transit, allotting $39 billion to modernize systems, improve access for the elderly and people with disabilities, and repair more than 24,000 buses, 5,000 rail cars and thousands of miles of train tracks.

Amtrak: The legislation marks the largest investment in passenger rail since the creation of Amtrak 50 years ago, with $66 billion earmarked for high-speed rail, safety improvements, Amtrak grants and to modernize the rail route connecting Washington, D.C., to Boston.

Broadband internet: Tacking on to billions authorized by last year's American Rescue Plan, the infrastructure bill includes $65 billion to bolster the country's broadband infrastructure and help ensure every American has access to high-speed internet, with one in four households expected to be eligible for a $30-per-month subsidy to pay for internet.

Electric grid: Though many clean-energy measures were cut from the bill to satisfy spending-weary lawmakers, a $65 billion investment will help upgrade the nation's electricity grid, with thousands of miles of new transmission lines and funds for environmentally friendly smart-grid technology.

Electric cars, buses and ferries: In addition to $7.5 billion for the nation's first network of electric-vehicle chargers along highway corridors, lawmakers have shored up $5 billion for zero-emission buses (including thousands of electric school buses) and $2.5 billion for ferries.
Clean drinking water: Following high-profile water-supply crises plaguing cities like Flint, Michigan, the legislation includes a provision for $55 billion to replace all the nation's lead pipes and service lines, representing the largest investment in clean drinking water ever.
Great rivers and lakes: Among the bill's $48 billion for water infrastructure improvements, about $1 billion is slated to go toward the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, a sweeping clean-up measure targeting toxic hot spots—or areas of heavy industrial pollution—around the Great Lakes region.

Airports: More than $25 billion has been allocated to help modernize America's airports—funds the Airports Council International says will help tackle more than $115 billion worth of project backlogs.

Road safety: The deal invests $11 billion in transportation safety programs, including a new program to help states and localities reduce crashes and fatalities in their communities, particularly among cyclists and pedestrians.



Funny how before the Virginia election the headlines were about the 1.2 Trillion Dollar Plan and Joe Biden as FDR and JFK rolled into one.

Now, after the election, the headline number is only 550 Billion Dollars.

Either way, in a little while, we will soon be talking real money.
 

CBH99

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Likely won't result in problems, but i would not want to be a Canadian flagged ship travelling in Russian waters for now.

That has to suck for the crew and research staff, who end up caught in the middle of a legal battle between two corporate entities.

The crew are just there to crew the ship, and the researchers to measure and record what they think is important. None of these folks were necessarily even working for the company during the alleged grounding incident - yet get caught in the middle of it nonetheless.


I agree I wouldn’t want to be a Canadian flagged ship in Russian waters right around now. But I have a feeling that IF Russia retaliates in kind, they’ll be treated much better than if it were China.
 

FJAG

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BRING BACK THE SIGHTSEEING SIXTH: THE CASE FOR AN ARCTIC DIVISION​

R. F. M. Williams | 12.14.21
Bring Back the Sightseeing Sixth: The Case for an Arctic Division

Thanks to renewed emphasis on Arctic operations from potential adversaries, the United States Army has expressed a desire to form forces explicitly developed to fight in Arctic environments. Personnel from the Maneuver Center of Excellence at Fort Benning have begun meeting with soldiers assigned to US Army Alaska to discuss concepts for future units. Among the things they will undoubtedly discover is that the Arctic presents unique challenges to military forces and, consequently, the specialized experience required by the environment can only be found in units that routinely operate there. For now, the Army’s pursuit of an Arctic-optimized unit seems to be focused on the possibility of reshaping the Stryker brigade combat team stationed at Fort Wainwright. But as the service looks toward reestablishing division-level formations at the center of its force structure—a departure from the brigade-centric model that was oriented toward meeting the needs of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan—devoting a single brigade combat team to Arctic readiness seems out of step. ...


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Kirkhill

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US SOCOM offering to assist the indigenous peoples of the Arctic with governance issues.

I kinda thought that was Ottawa's job. And I think the Danes, Norwegians, Swedes and Finns might be less than thrilled as well. Can't speak for the Russians. Don't know them that well.

 

Good2Golf

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US SOCOM offering to assist the indigenous peoples of the Arctic with governance issues.

I kinda thought that was Ottawa's job. And I think the Danes, Norwegians, Swedes and Finns might be less than thrilled as well. Can't speak for the Russians. Don't know them that well.

Well…at least one North American country is taking the Arctic seriously…
 

Blackadder1916

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US SOCOM offering to assist the indigenous peoples of the Arctic with governance issues.

I kinda thought that was Ottawa's job. And I think the Danes, Norwegians, Swedes and Finns might be less than thrilled as well. Can't speak for the Russians. Don't know them that well.



Probably the most valid statement of the article can be found at the bottom -"The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official position of the United States Military Academy, Department of the Army, or Department of Defense.".
 

Good2Golf

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Probably the most valid statement of the article can be found at the bottom -"The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official position of the United States Military Academy, Department of the Army, or Department of Defense.".
At least one knows the source of ‘trial balloons’ in the US, unlike Canada where politicians and senior civil servants form a cadre of ‘unidentified sources’ to their select journalists for ‘distribution without attribution.’
 

MarkOttawa

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Note on naval front:

Panel: Smaller NATO Navies Struggle with Recruitment, Awareness​

...
Speaking at an international navies session at the Surface Navy Association symposium in Arlington, Va., Capt. William Quinn, naval attache at the Canadian Embassy...

...Quinn...[did not see] the Arctic as becoming an immediate security threat to Germany or Canada. Quinn said that the Northern Sea Route closest to Russia now is more attractive to merchant shipping than the poorly charted Northwest Passage.

“The bigger issue will be how we divide up that pie” of mineral and energy exploration, Quinn said. He added this has to be done while preserving environmental safeguards and the rights of the indigenous peoples...

Mark
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MarkOttawa

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Note invitation for Russian observers at end of quote. Wonder how large CAF participation will be? Frigate? CP-140? Army unit? The real Russian defence/naval worry in the Arctic seems to be the Euro area, including for the USN. North American Arctic not a problem in itself, rather as a route for cruise missiles to attack more southerly targets:

Two NATO carrier groups will sail north for exercise Cold Response​

As Russia deploys the new 3M22 Tsirkon anti-ship hypersonic missile in the Barents Sea, NATO has decided to send two of its most potent naval weapons to the Norwegian-led Exercise Cold Response, the aircraft carriers "HMS Prince of Wales" and the "USS Harry S Truman".

With the aim to train reinforcement of northern Norway, Cold Response will be the largest NATO exercise inside the Arctic Circle since the 1980s. Some 35,000 soldiers from 28 nations will participate and a significant portion of the training that kicks off in March will be at sea and in the air.

Preparation for the long-time planned exercise is already well underway and is not directly linked to the current standoff between NATO and Moscow over Russia’s massive military buildup of troops at Ukraine’s border. However, a conflict in eastern Europe could spill over to the Arctic as the Kola Peninsula is home to some of Russia’s most powerful weapon systems, including hypersonic cruise missiles and the naval component of the strategic nuclear triad.

On December 24, President Vladimir Putin said his military forces successfully fired a simultaneous salvo of the Tsirkon hypersonic missile. The weapon is now ready for deployment with the Northern Fleet on both frigates and the 4th generation multi-purpose submarines of the Yasen-class.

Launched from the Russian sector of the Barents Sea, the Tsirkon missiles could reach targets in the Norwegian Sea in about 10 to 15 minutes if Moscow in a war conflict chose to activate its Bastion defense concept aimed at denying NATO forces control of the Norwegian and Greenland seas.

Russian military observers posit that Tsirkon, with ability to maneuver mid-flight, easily can bypass any US or British carrier groups’ surface-to-air self-protection systems...

For the next 12 months, the “HMS Prince of Wales” is responsible for leading NATO’s Maritime High Readiness Force, a task group formed to deal with major global events...

Cold Response 2022 (CR22) kicks off in the second half of March and will continue to the beginning of April.

US carrier group

First intended to sail through the Suez into the Gulf, the American carrier group “USS Harry S Truman” has due to Russia’s military threat to Ukraine been held in the Eastern Mediterranean. Norway’s frigate “Fridtjof Nansen” is part of the carrier group.

Norway’s Minister of Defense, Odd Roger Enoksen, said in an interview with newspaper VG this week that the American carrier group and the Norwegian frigate in February will sail to the North Atlantic where the plan is to take part in the NATO exercise Cold Response 2022...

Land, sea and air

According to the latest update from the Norwegian Armed Forces, Exercise Cold Response will consist of 14,000 soldiers on land, 13,000 at sea and 8,000 serving aircraft and headquarters at different bases.

In times of growing distrust between Russia and Europe, Norway seeks to build its security in partnership with NATO allies and Nordic neighbors.

The main action during Cold Response 2022 will be by navy and air force capacities in the Ofoten area...

Ofoten is also home to Evenes airport where Norway’s new fleet of P8 Poseidon maritime surveillance planes will be based together with NATO’s two northernmost Quick Reaction Alert (QRA) F-35s fighter jets on standby to meet Russian military planes flying near Norwegian air space. For NATO and the Nordic countries’ defense partnership, Ofoten is core strategic important in case of a larger global conflict involving Russia in the North-Atlantic.

The area is about 600 kilometers from the Kola Peninsula where the Northern Fleet’s nuclear submarines are based.

Russia invited

Head of the Norwegian Armed Forces, General Eirik Kristoffersen, said to the Barents Observer last year that Russia is informed about the exercise “in accordance with international standards and agreements.”

Under the Vienna Document, member states in the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) invite each other to observe military exercises.

“Russia will be invited to observe Cold Response 2022,” Kristoffersen said...

Rather a mighty show of force what with those two carriers--though how long carriers would survive in the High North in a shooting war...

Mark
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