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Canadian soldier charged with feeding cannabis cupcakes to artillery unit during live-fire exercise

Jarnhamar

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Bdr Cogswell did something unforgivable and tried to use her diagnosis to save her own skin; that in and of itself is deplorable. Mental Health diagnosis is an explanation, not an excuse. The first thing you're told is that regardless of your struggles, you're still accountable for your actions. She tried to shirk that accountability and I hope she gets what's coming to her.
Sounds like something a lawyer may come up with as well.
 

OldSolduer

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True leaders prepare their soldiers for war.
The CF did a horrible job at that (I would assume still does - but I am long stale for that comment to have 100% accuracy ) - as do most Militaries outside of their SOF. In the same vein that most LE and other first responders do a piss poor job of preparing their members for emotional trauma.

Proper mental training, effective and realistic training would do a heck of a lot more do reduce issues of CSR/PTSD.
As opposed to a bunch of BS bravado in training that does nothing for downrange effects.

Education into what the body and mind do under stress, and giving member the tools and conditioning to function during and after critical incidents is going to pay off a whole lot more than soley dealing with issues after the incidents.

Proper counseling after issues helps, and not some half baked counsellor - but real professional mental health specialists who specialize in the specific area of trauma.
You are so correct. I said over 20 years ago we do a great job of prepping soldiers physically - PT, weapons training etc - but we never took the time to prep their headspace and timing, if you know what I mean.

The CAF started the Road To Mental Readiness in about 2008 IIRC. R2MR for short. We adopted it in Corrections here in Manitoba. I actually teach it. I think its a good program, but we have to wait a few years to see if its effective.
 

Z.E.R.T.

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What are you trying to say?
The US soldiers are tired of poor leadership and be threated like sht* alots of them leaving after only 1 enlistment..Because of that! if you go on U.S Army W.T.F! moments forum and facebook page. Always the same story coming out.
 

dangerboy

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You are so correct. I said over 20 years ago we do a great job of prepping soldiers physically - PT, weapons training etc - but we never took the time to prep their headspace and timing, if you know what I mean.
We gave out a bunch of copies of Dave Grossman's book "On Combat" and had him speak to the BNs. That was enough to tick the box off I guess
 

OldSolduer

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We gave out a bunch of copies of Dave Grossman's book "On Combat" and had him speak to the BNs. That was enough to tick the box off I guess
Not enough IMO. Realistic training - where things go wrong -, the focus on the Big 4 and how to destress yourself are huge components. Hyper vigilance is a real concern once you leave the theatre.

Speaking of which my sneaky granddaughter caused my amygdala to startle me - she's a good stalker. Sneaky little thing. Maybe sniper material?
 

ArmyRick

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Not enough IMO. Realistic training - where things go wrong -, the focus on the Big 4 and how to destress yourself are huge components. Hyper vigilance is a real concern once you leave the theatre.

Speaking of which my sneaky granddaughter caused my amygdala to startle me - she's a good stalker. Sneaky little thing. Maybe sniper material?
Jim, we used to see you as the instructor with pearls of wisdom for us greenhorns in battleschool. Good insights.
 

LittleBlackDevil

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Sounds like something a lawyer may come up with as well.

Of course it is ... a defence lawyer's job is to advocate for his/her client and do whatever they can to mitigate consequences. Prosecution role is to advocate for harsher penalty. The judge makes the final decision after hearing both sides.
 
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