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C3 Howitzer Replacement

FJAG

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Some would say that could be an understatement.
But perhaps looking back at some of the other CO's I had, Maybe not an outlier...
I keep hearing stories about the "Left-Coast Brigade" which would indicate he would have fit in right there although the one thing you could always say about him was that he was sincere. Off base -- but sincere.

๐Ÿป
 

daftandbarmy

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I keep hearing stories about the "Left-Coast Brigade" which would indicate he would have fit in right there although the one thing you could always say about him was that he was sincere. Off base -- but sincere.

๐Ÿป

Dude, I'm in the room ;)
Dumb And Dumber Ketchup GIF





Dumb And Dumber Ketchup GIF

Dumb And Dumber Ketchup GIF
 

KevinB

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Interesting SPG solution from Singapore
Boy that sure looks like something designed by a committee.

๐Ÿ˜
It was probably entirely functional and appropriate until they sent it for legal review...

Actually I think it's a pretty good solution for Singapore.
The joke says the little City/State's national bird is the crane (as in construction crane).
They have gone to gas in between the tire areas in parking spots all over -- as there isn't a lot of available space - outside the zoo, and over the bridge.
Range space is extremely limited - - but also employability if it was needed - as its become a massive city sprawl - so anything will need to work in urban areas and have very high angle - as well as very nimble.

Singapore went from a burgeoning small arms industry - to closing to buy small arms from Western Nations - and put its engineers and industry working on vehicle systems that work for their environment - as they are generally shorter in a statue to Westerners - but also their operational defense needs are different due to the terrain.
 

Old Sweat

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I had just worked my way up to TC F Tp in 1 RCHA in the Spring of 1964 when Lt Marmo was posted in as Troop Leader on commissioning. He was, shall we say, an individual individual. Just about the first thing he managed to do was totally alientate all the troops by "coffee break" on Day One. Actually, he had been tasked to set an ambush for F Troop, and he set it. E Troop soon appeared moving tactically and not too badly through the bush, so young Mister Marmo decided to stalk back and forth across the position, correcting the fire positions by kicking the insides of their boots and legs, which exposing himself while fully erect. It did not go over well, but was only the start of a not too long or very distinguished career in F Troop.
 

daftandbarmy

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Actually I think it's a pretty good solution for Singapore.
The joke says the little City/State's national bird is the crane (as in construction crane).
They have gone to gas in between the tire areas in parking spots all over -- as there isn't a lot of available space - outside the zoo, and over the bridge.
Range space is extremely limited - - but also employability if it was needed - as its become a massive city sprawl - so anything will need to work in urban areas and have very high angle - as well as very nimble.

Singapore went from a burgeoning small arms industry - to closing to buy small arms from Western Nations - and put its engineers and industry working on vehicle systems that work for their environment - as they are generally shorter in a statue to Westerners - but also their operational defense needs are different due to the terrain.

They have hundreds of armoured vehicles etc in Australia and make us look pretty anemic in comparison.

Make no mistake, they intend to defend Singapore at all costs if required.


New treaty allows SAF to train in vastly expanded area in Australia​


The Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) will have access to a vastly expanded training area in the Australian state of Queensland following the signing of a treaty on Monday (March 23) between the defence ministers of the two countries.

The expanded Shoalwater Bay Training Area is scheduled to be completed by 2024, and the Greenvale Training Area by 2028. Combined, both areas are about 10 times the size of Singapore.

Advanced training facilities will be built, such as air-land ranges for combined arms allowing the Singapore army and air force to train together with tanks, infantry fighting vehicles, drones and artillery guns, said the Ministry of Defence in a statement on Monday.

Urban operations live-firing facilities allowing for training in a realistic urban environment will also be built.

The enhanced military training access followed the signing of the treaty on Military Training and Training Area Development in Australia.

It was an upgrade of the existing memorandum of understanding signed in 2016 under the Comprehensive Strategic Partnership between Australia and Singapore. The treaty marked a "significant milestone" in bilateral defence relations, said the Mindef statement.

"The advanced training facilities will benefit both armed forces and deepen defence cooperation," it said.

In total, the SAF will be able to conduct training for up to 18 weeks annually, involving up to 14,000 personnel for 25 years when the training areas are completed. This is up from six weeks and 6,600 personnel currently.

Training vehicles and equipment involved will also be increased from up to 500 now to up to 2,400 in 2028.

 

Kirkhill

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They have hundreds of armoured vehicles etc in Australia and make us look pretty anemic in comparison.

Make no mistake, they intend to defend Singapore at all costs if required.


New treaty allows SAF to train in vastly expanded area in Australia​


The Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) will have access to a vastly expanded training area in the Australian state of Queensland following the signing of a treaty on Monday (March 23) between the defence ministers of the two countries.

The expanded Shoalwater Bay Training Area is scheduled to be completed by 2024, and the Greenvale Training Area by 2028. Combined, both areas are about 10 times the size of Singapore.

Advanced training facilities will be built, such as air-land ranges for combined arms allowing the Singapore army and air force to train together with tanks, infantry fighting vehicles, drones and artillery guns, said the Ministry of Defence in a statement on Monday.

Urban operations live-firing facilities allowing for training in a realistic urban environment will also be built.

The enhanced military training access followed the signing of the treaty on Military Training and Training Area Development in Australia.

It was an upgrade of the existing memorandum of understanding signed in 2016 under the Comprehensive Strategic Partnership between Australia and Singapore. The treaty marked a "significant milestone" in bilateral defence relations, said the Mindef statement.

"The advanced training facilities will benefit both armed forces and deepen defence cooperation," it said.

In total, the SAF will be able to conduct training for up to 18 weeks annually, involving up to 14,000 personnel for 25 years when the training areas are completed. This is up from six weeks and 6,600 personnel currently.

Training vehicles and equipment involved will also be increased from up to 500 now to up to 2,400 in 2028.

17 FEBRUARY 2021

Singapore announces budget increase for 2021​

by Jon Grevatt & Andrew MacDonald



The government of Singapore announced on 16 February a 2021 defence budget of SGD15.36 billion (USD11.56 billion).

The new allocation, which amounts to about 15% of total government outlay for the year, is a 12.7% increase over the revised 2020 defence budget of SGD13.63 billion but just a 1.8% increase compared to the original 2020 expenditure of SGD15.08 billion.

The government made no reference to the cuts in the 2020 defence expenditure, but indicated they were linked with rising economic headwinds, specifically the Covid-19 pandemic.


Approximately 3.2% of GDP according to SIPRI

We could probably find the money to equip, deploy and train a division annually in Europe at that level of investment. I wish we could.


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FJAG

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New treaty allows SAF to train in vastly expanded area in Australia​


The Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) will have access to a vastly expanded training area in the Australian state of Queensland following the signing of a treaty on Monday (March 23) between the defence ministers of the two countries.

The expanded Shoalwater Bay Training Area is scheduled to be completed by 2024, and the Greenvale Training Area by 2028. Combined, both areas are about 10 times the size of Singapore.

That should get all the ecologists up in arms. When you wiki "Shoalwater Bay Training Area" you get this:

Shoalwater Bay Military Training Area is a heritage-listed military installation at Byfield Road, Byfield, Shire of Livingstone, Queensland, Australia. It is a large, relatively undisturbed and intact natural system with a wide variety of coastal landforms and a high level of biodiversity. It contains a diverse range of marine and coastal wetland landscapes, vegetation types and ecosystems. It was added to the Australian Commonwealth Heritage List on 22 June 2004.[1]
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daftandbarmy

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That should get all the ecologists up in arms. When you wiki "Shoalwater Bay Training Area" you get this:



๐Ÿป

It's the same in the UK. Except there are large and influential community lobby groups that advocate for the retention of the military training areas as they host, and protect, flora and fauna that are almost extinct elsewhere in the UK.
 

FJAG

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It's the same in the UK. Except there are large and influential community lobby groups that advocate for the retention of the military training areas as they host, and protect, flora and fauna that are almost extinct elsewhere in the UK.
That actually had a lot of pull in Shilo. Never underestimate the power of the Prairie Skink.

prairieskink.jpg

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Colin Parkinson

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UBC, Hasting Park and Stanley Park were all military reserves, the military generally does a good job of maintaining areas that allow a lot of wildlife and habitat to remain.
 

AmmoTech90

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It's the same in the UK. Except there are large and influential community lobby groups that advocate for the retention of the military training areas as they host, and protect, flora and fauna that are almost extinct elsewhere in the UK.
Studies in Suffield have shown that tracks and wheels on the Prairie don't do a whole of damage and can be beneficial. Of course if you drive over a burrowing owl den then you are in trouble so some precautions are taken, but the interaction between wheels/tracks and ground isn't terrible.

UXO is mark and avoid for the most part, been a couple of years since the last confirmed Chem item (and that took around 18 months to remove from the ground- was a largish drop tanks nicely buried with only a pipe sticking out). The Brits manage not poison themselves- but I think Canadian military egos are more fragile and wouldn't deal well with being told, don't go in the red areas and no we're not going to tell you why.
 

KevinB

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Make no mistake, they intend to defend Singapore at all costs if required.
I totally agree with you - I was there primarily dealing with their SF - but I found their shift from buying Large Systems - and home grown Small Arms - to buying Small Arms and homegrown Armor and other larger pieces was interesting.
They definitely look at their requirements - and do an honest analysis of what is better to buy (Small arms, Helicopters) versus their niche needs that they can make internally (and support easier in conflict due to their location).
 

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From what I'm hearing, It is clear from the VOR for both the C3 and LG1 fleets that this situation is not surprisingly getting worse. It is taking months to get a C3 repaired, some don't return, and the LG1 barrel cracking continues, as do other related ancillary eqpt issues. It was bad of course before, but since this issue has wallowed in the staff world (much as the discussion over these past few pages) not much changed, except it's getting harder to keep a 105mm howitzer in the field in Canada. I suppose much as happened a decade ago, when a C3 literally snapped in two, it'll take some drastic event to change its priority (I was in DLR when that priority was rationalized away). Meanwhile the few remaining guns get shuffled around, like the proverbial Titanic deck chairs
 

FJAG

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For those in the Reg F who think reservists can't handle nice kit try this one on for size:

NCNG Artillery Unit First to Receive New M109A7 Paladin​

NCNG Artillery Unit First to Receive New M109A7 Paladin
Photo By Sgt. 1st Class Mary Junell | Soldiers with the North Carolina National Guardโ€™s 1st Battalion, 113th Field... read more

RALEIGH, NC, UNITED STATES​

05.21.2021​

Story by Staff Sgt. Mary Junell

North Carolina National Guard

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The 1st Battalion, 113th Field Artillery Regiment (1-113th FA), 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team (ABCT) conducted an artillery live-fire exercise with the newly fielded M109A7 Self-Propelled Howitzer System at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, May 20-21, 2021.

The 30th ABCT was the first National Guard brigade to receive the newest iteration of the Paladin and trained for almost two weeks before the live-fire event.

During the training, 1-113th Soldiers had the opportunities to learn the differences between the old hydraulic system and the new electric system before heading to the range.

Staff Sgt. Cody Fields, a section chief with C Battery, 1-113th FA, was excited to learn the new system.

"The new weapons system allows us to do it a little bit faster," Fields said. "Everything went from hydraulic to electric. It allows us to mitigate some of the maintenance issues we had in the past."

Col. Wes Morrison, the 30th ABCT Commander, saw the opportunity to be the first Guard unit to receive the Paladins as an honor.

"The 1-113th, with their history and the leadership they show in the field artillery community, they're certainly deserving," said Morrison.

Soldiers with the 1-113th, who returned home from the Middle East less than a year ago, will have spent 23 days training on the new equipment, which falls in line with the Army's post-deployment training goals.

"To get such a brand new piece of equipment and be able to come out here post-deployment and modernize exactly like we talk about in the Army; post-deployment you modernize on equipment, and then you start a new training cycle, so it's perfect for them," Morrison said.

Soldiers firing the new artillery were excited to get the hands-on training and took pride in learning how the new equipment operates.

"We're really excited to be given that honor and get to shoot these first," Fields said. "To actually shoot artillery and send that 100 pounds downrange in support of our brothers downrange, it's a great feeling."

The 1-113th replaced their entire fleet of Paladins with the new A7 model.


It's articles like this that continue to make me question the competence of our Reg F leadership over and over again.

:mad:
 

Colin Parkinson

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The Chieftain, now a L/Col in the ARNG gives a brief bit on how the NG functions from 41:00 to 47:00

bonus are tips on your Zombie defense plan from 23-27

 

daftandbarmy

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For those in the Reg F who think reservists can't handle nice kit try this one on for size:





It's articles like this that continue to make me question the competence of our Reg F leadership over and over again.

:mad:

And the Westies fielded a TOW det at one point, quite successfully. This was after they had to give up the 106mm, which they operated for several years.

One big complaint about the TOW vs. 106.... they only got to fire one live round from the former.
 

MilEME09

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And the Westies fielded a TOW det at one point, quite successfully. This was after they had to give up the 106mm, which they operated for several years.

One big complaint about the TOW vs. 106.... they only got to fire one live round from the former.
Thar is part of our problem too, live rounds are costing too much, hell I haven't thrown a live grenade in about 9 years, Carl G? Never and likely never will. Couldn't even fire a .50 cal on my DP2 due to last minute changes I'm the TP......

Point is more funds should be allocated to domestic munitions production.
 
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