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AJAX fix?

KevinB

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Until recently lawmakers and others were calling for the program to be canceled, with Ajax becoming the poster child for wider procurement problems suffered by the ministry. Those problems appear to be finally behind the vehicle, which is undergoing reliability growth trials after successfully completing user validation assessments.

 
Until recently lawmakers and others were calling for the program to be canceled, with Ajax becoming the poster child for wider procurement problems suffered by the ministry. Those problems appear to be finally behind the vehicle, which is undergoing reliability growth trials after successfully completing user validation assessments.

I have a question.

Can no one design an AFV that doesn't incur cost overruns? or doesn't work like it should?
 
I have a question.

Can no one design an AFV that doesn't incur cost overruns? or doesn't work like it should?
Well if one gives a very clear RFP - then yes. AJAX was an odd duck acquisition, as it was chosen over the CV90 based on a glossy brochure of what could be done - rather than an actual working production model.

The UK MoD wanted a bunch of things, and GD claimed a lot of things where possible - when it wasn't nearly as simple as that.
The Add on Armor is a massive difference in GVW, and the original armament and FCS changed as well.
 
Well if one gives a very clear RFP - then yes. AJAX was an odd duck acquisition, as it was chosen over the CV90 based on a glossy brochure of what could be done - rather than an actual working production model.

The UK MoD wanted a bunch of things, and GD claimed a lot of things where possible - when it wasn't nearly as simple as that.
The Add on Armor is a massive difference in GVW, and the original armament and FCS changed as well.
Seems the CAF is the not the only one who doesn't know what it wants to be. Or do.
 

British army’s new Ajax fighting vehicle will not be ready until end of decade - 20 Mar 23​

Labour accuses government of failing taxpayers and troops with £5.5bn programme that is already six years late

A troubled £5.5bn programme that is already six years late in building the British army’s new Ajax fighting vehicle will not be delivered until the end of the decade.

Labour accused the government of failing British taxpayers and troops after the Ministry of Defence confirmed that payments towards vehicles would resume after ministers concluded the programme was “turning a corner”.

Originally intended to enter service in 2017, the programme has been repeatedly delayed, with problems including noise and vibration issues that have injured soldiers testing the vehicles.

After halting payments to General Dynamics Land Systems UK (GDLS-UK) more than two years ago, the MoD said on Monday it would hand over £480m this month to the arms company. It said full operating capability was expected between October 2028 and September 2029, when the army has trained and converted forces to the vehicle.

The defence procurement minister, Alex Chalk, said in a written statement to MPs that payments would resume with an instalment of about half of what has been held back since December 2020.

“Restarting payments to General Dynamics reflects the fact that the programme continues to return to a firm footing and supports the delivery of the schedule to deliver operational capability,” he added.

He said further payments for 589 of the fighting vehicles would be made against a “new schedule and its milestones”.

“The Ajax programme is turning a corner, but this does not remove the need for the department to identify and learn lessons,” he added.

However, John Healey, the shadow defence secretary, accused the Conservatives of spending billions more on a project that is already six years late and will not fully deliver until the end of this decade.

“The defence secretary has made Ajax central to the future of the army and the UK’s ability to fulfil our Nato obligations, yet after 13 years and £4bn investment the army has still not got a single deployable vehicle,” he added.

“It is clear the government can’t deliver value for public money or the equipment our forces need to fight. Ministers are failing British taxpayers and British troops.”
The public spending watchdog said earlier this month that the army had been left with ageing armoured vehicles that were expensive to maintain as a result of delays which meant the MoD had received only 26 vehicles as of December 2021 after paying £3.2bn. The National Audit Office said the MoD and GDLS-UK’s approach was flawed from the start and they did not fully understand the scale or complexity of the Ajax programme.

Action to overcome problems now includes modifications to better isolate the human body through measures including cushioning and the introduction of a layered approach to ear protection that includes inner ear pieces so troops can communicate and outer ear protection.

Five hundred and eighty-nine Ajax vehicles, assembled predominantly at General Dynamics in Merthyr Tydfil, are due to be delivered to the British army. The whole programme remains within its originally approved budget level, according to the MoD.
 
whats the fix? A set of ear plugs and a nice cushion?

gun threatening GIF by South Park
 

British army’s new Ajax fighting vehicle will not be ready until end of decade - 20 Mar 23​

Labour accuses government of failing taxpayers and troops with £5.5bn programme that is already six years late

A troubled £5.5bn programme that is already six years late in building the British army’s new Ajax fighting vehicle will not be delivered until the end of the decade.

Labour accused the government of failing British taxpayers and troops after the Ministry of Defence confirmed that payments towards vehicles would resume after ministers concluded the programme was “turning a corner”.

Originally intended to enter service in 2017, the programme has been repeatedly delayed, with problems including noise and vibration issues that have injured soldiers testing the vehicles.

After halting payments to General Dynamics Land Systems UK (GDLS-UK) more than two years ago, the MoD said on Monday it would hand over £480m this month to the arms company. It said full operating capability was expected between October 2028 and September 2029, when the army has trained and converted forces to the vehicle.

The defence procurement minister, Alex Chalk, said in a written statement to MPs that payments would resume with an instalment of about half of what has been held back since December 2020.

“Restarting payments to General Dynamics reflects the fact that the programme continues to return to a firm footing and supports the delivery of the schedule to deliver operational capability,” he added.

He said further payments for 589 of the fighting vehicles would be made against a “new schedule and its milestones”.

“The Ajax programme is turning a corner, but this does not remove the need for the department to identify and learn lessons,” he added.

However, John Healey, the shadow defence secretary, accused the Conservatives of spending billions more on a project that is already six years late and will not fully deliver until the end of this decade.

“The defence secretary has made Ajax central to the future of the army and the UK’s ability to fulfil our Nato obligations, yet after 13 years and £4bn investment the army has still not got a single deployable vehicle,” he added.

“It is clear the government can’t deliver value for public money or the equipment our forces need to fight. Ministers are failing British taxpayers and British troops.”
The public spending watchdog said earlier this month that the army had been left with ageing armoured vehicles that were expensive to maintain as a result of delays which meant the MoD had received only 26 vehicles as of December 2021 after paying £3.2bn. The National Audit Office said the MoD and GDLS-UK’s approach was flawed from the start and they did not fully understand the scale or complexity of the Ajax programme.

Action to overcome problems now includes modifications to better isolate the human body through measures including cushioning and the introduction of a layered approach to ear protection that includes inner ear pieces so troops can communicate and outer ear protection.

Five hundred and eighty-nine Ajax vehicles, assembled predominantly at General Dynamics in Merthyr Tydfil, are due to be delivered to the British army. The whole programme remains within its originally approved budget level, according to the MoD.
HA! double ear protection
 
TBH that isn’t a bad thing.
It forces individual comms and hearing pro, and will likely save troops hearing later.

I know I wish comms/ear pro was a thing in my earlier days.
The $ I get from the CAF for tinnitus isn’t worth the end results I have.
Plus enjoying the exchange rate! Lol
 
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