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2021 federal budget and the CAF

dapaterson

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Except many do cosmetic touch ups to make the flip, and conceal underlying issues that the subsequent purchaser gets saddled with. IE the house across the street with the addition torn down that they are still trying to remediate.
 

SeaKingTacco

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Except many do cosmetic touch ups to make the flip, and conceal underlying issues that the subsequent purchaser gets saddled with. IE the house across the street with the addition torn down that they are still trying to remediate.
I am not talking about those guys- they are house flippers.

The renovating investor, in many cases, takes the house back to the studs and rebuilds from there.
 

Colin Parkinson

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I am not talking about those guys- they are house flippers.

The renovating investor, in many cases, takes the house back to the studs and rebuilds from there.
Doing that also invokes a different set of rules and is generally easier and faster than trying to get permits for a new house, which might entail several new requirements or restrictions.
 

dapaterson

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The local approach is to leave a single wall standing, and thus claim that it's a reno, not a rebuild, and therefore grandfathered, including code.
 

Navy_Pete

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A building that needs to be gutted and rebuilt from the ground up... a good metaphor.
Looking at other departments I'd suggest it's more of a neighbourhood. Sometimes you need a cleansing fire so you can fix the road layouts and other infrastructure.

After being attached to other departments it's shocking that we're actually more functional than many others. Budget and planning wise we are lightyears ahead of any of the other big ones; we're just hamstrung by a combination of the insane TBS/PSPC processes, lack of people to manage the workload, and also a loss of experience with DRAP and other 'planned reductions' to meet reduced SWE caps.
 

daftandbarmy

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You must be the first person who calls Vancouver politics "fun" - except maybe for the current mayor.

Like mainland Europe from Dover, it's fun to watch from the other side of a significant water gap, while watching the fires dance aorund your own ankles :)
 

Halifax Tar

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Its a decent question. But ask those out of work if they need supports and I'm sure they say yes.

Its a weird economy.

I hear daily that small businesses and large business cannot afford to keep running, that small business owners have used up all their savings, meanwhile the laid off workers are banking those unemployment checks.

I suppose the notion that you can never use too much water putting out a fire is the working theory right now. The best news we can have is that once the economy is open again, all those savings get poured into the economy, leading to a period of higher than normal growth that is sustainable for a few years and leads to the debt to GDP shrinking simply due to the GDP growing at a faster pace than the debt.

That depends. When fighting a fire at sea, command needs to be concerned with the amount of water being put into a space or you will cause stability issues.
 

Lumber

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Looking at other departments I'd suggest it's more of a neighbourhood. Sometimes you need a cleansing fire so you can fix the road layouts and other infrastructure.

After being attached to other departments it's shocking that we're actually more functional than many others. Budget and planning wise we are lightyears ahead of any of the other big ones; we're just hamstrung by a combination of the insane TBS/PSPC processes, lack of people to manage the workload, and also a loss of experience with DRAP and other 'planned reductions' to meet reduced SWE caps.
Which department did you have the pleasure of working with?

I do think that sometimes we forget how well trained, organized, and competent we are. When the CAF works with OGDs, for example, one of the OGDs may be the lead agency with overall command, but they differ to us to organize, plan, and execute the operation, because they simply don't have training in that.

We are so short LCdrs and above in the RCN right now. Are there any ways we can offload the less "militaryesque" jobs to a civilian, pan-government agency? Perhaps a way to save money, impart or expertise, and free up military personnel, would be to amalgamate some of our less military oriented organization/units into pan-government organiztions/positions. Instead of having military members working in, say, the sexual misconduct response centre, you make that a civilian centre that responds to issues from across the GOC, thereby providing the service to more than just the CAF, and freeing up those military personnel to do more military-related tasks.
 

Navy_Pete

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Which department did you have the pleasure of working with?

I do think that sometimes we forget how well trained, organized, and competent we are. When the CAF works with OGDs, for example, one of the OGDs may be the lead agency with overall command, but they differ to us to organize, plan, and execute the operation, because they simply don't have training in that.

We are so short LCdrs and above in the RCN right now. Are there any ways we can offload the less "militaryesque" jobs to a civilian, pan-government agency? Perhaps a way to save money, impart or expertise, and free up military personnel, would be to amalgamate some of our less military oriented organization/units into pan-government organiztions/positions. Instead of having military members working in, say, the sexual misconduct response centre, you make that a civilian centre that responds to issues from across the GOC, thereby providing the service to more than just the CAF, and freeing up those military personnel to do more military-related tasks.
I got chucked into the NSS office, so worked with PSPC and CCG regularly, but also got to regularly work with TBS, Industry Canada, Finance, the PMO and some others. Was pretty funny to see TBS employees struggle through a contract they had to manage themselves. There has been a LCdr there since inception, but it's a weird spot in general with the committee lead decisions.

Prime example that comes to mind was CCG didn't have an overall budgeted fleet plan that inclued replacements for their rusting out ships (equivalent to SSE plan). So took them longer to get money for new capital funding because they had to explain the operational requirement everytime. They've got that sorted now but took a few years. Their actual project managements is a lot more streamlined internally though, but just meant they had no overall costed strategic plan at the big giant head level, whereas ours is down to the dime and has been for a long time. Like CCG a lot and how they do business, so was just a case of they hadn't dealt with a problem on that scale before.

For other departments, it was also an experience level and relative funds they run with. At one point was at some kind of generic NCR engineering mixer and there was some DG equivalent from EnviroCanada talking about the challenges for a $500k project. Didn't mention I was running a $30M dollar project as a jr two ringer. We get used to big sticker shock, but people get hung up on dollar value vs actual complexity.
 

lenaitch

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Which department did you have the pleasure of working with?

I do think that sometimes we forget how well trained, organized, and competent we are. When the CAF works with OGDs, for example, one of the OGDs may be the lead agency with overall command, but they differ to us to organize, plan, and execute the operation, because they simply don't have training in that.

We are so short LCdrs and above in the RCN right now. Are there any ways we can offload the less "militaryesque" jobs to a civilian, pan-government agency? Perhaps a way to save money, impart or expertise, and free up military personnel, would be to amalgamate some of our less military oriented organization/units into pan-government organiztions/positions. Instead of having military members working in, say, the sexual misconduct response centre, you make that a civilian centre that responds to issues from across the GOC, thereby providing the service to more than just the CAF, and freeing up those military personnel to do more military-related tasks.

You mean like Shared Services? I hope the federal roll-out of that went better than Ontario's. One problem with so-called 'pan-government' services is the public service doesn't have an inherent culture of client/customer service because, unlike the commercial world, there is little to no downside of doing it badly. I'm not convinced many even try to consider and apply the needs and culture of their clients. Their primary goal is to maintain or enhance their existence, often at the expense of the other departments they are supposed to serve.
 

Altair

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That depends. When fighting a fire at sea, command needs to be concerned with the amount of water being put into a space or you will cause stability issues.
I guess that one needs to weight what is worse, fire or stability issues.
 

Altair

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You would think that with printing all this money, the loonie would drop.

Nope.

!
The loonie pushed through the psychologically important 80 U.S. cent barrier in recent weeks for the first time since 2018, and analysts believe it’s next move is most likely northwards.
Scotiabank analyst Hugo Ste-Marie says technical charts suggest the loonie “appears likely to reach at minimum” near US$0.82. The currency was trading at 80.66 U.S. cents this morning.
Indeed, the loonie has surged 1.6 per cent in the past four days alone, driven by the Bank of Canada’s moves last week that surprised markets.

The Bank announced a taper of its weekly net purchases of government bonds and also implied a ‘hawkish’ forward guidance on its first rate hike.

With oil steady at around US$60 per barrel and likely poised to remain at these levels, there are signs the Canadian dollar could strengthen further, especially in contrast to the U.S. Federal Reserve’s dovish tone and trillions of U.S. dollar being injected into the economy.

Compared to the USA, I guess Canada looks tame.
 

SeaKingTacco

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You would think that with printing all this money, the loonie would drop.

Nope.

!


Compared to the USA, I guess Canada looks tame.
I am guessing here that currency traders are betting on a commodities boom in the next year (including evil oil!), which positions the Canadian Dollar, nicely.

If we were smart, we take advantage of this to pay off as much debt as we can that we owe outside the country. Debt borrowed from inside Canada does not pose as much of an issue.
 
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